San Francisco State University President Les E. Wong, left, listens to the student Katie Rivers voice concerns with pouring rights issues during a town hall meeting at Seven Hills Conference Center at SFSU on Thursday, Nov.19. ( Courtesy Qing Huang/Golden Gate Xpress)

San Francisco State University President Les E. Wong, left, listens to the student Katie Rivers voice concerns with pouring rights issues during a town hall meeting at Seven Hills Conference Center at SFSU on Thursday, Nov.19. ( Courtesy Qing Huang/Golden Gate Xpress)

SF State plan to partner with beverage company fizzles out

San Francisco State University will not enter into a partnership with a beverage company after facing backlash over the proposal from students and faculty members, the school announced Thursday.

The university began exploring whether to partner with a beverage company earlier this year to help fund student programs and better regulate the on-campus beverage market, but the effort quickly met resistance from the SFSU community.

A student resolution against pouring rights at the campus last month emphasized that such a partnership could promote the use of sugary beverages and detract from maintaining SFSU as a publicly-funded institution.

“A pouring rights contract between SFSU and a soft drink manufacturer, such as CocaCola Co. or Pepsi Co., is not suitable for San Francisco State University and all negotiations must be terminated immediately, due to its violation of SFSU values and community standards of environmental responsibility, human rights, good health, local empowerment and shared governance,” the resolution stated.

In a statement Thursday, SFSU President Les Wong said he was grateful to hear concerns from the school community and that he will continue to explore alternative sources of money for the university.

“As president, I have an obligation to explore all avenues for obtaining additional resources for our students, faculty and staff, especially as state support for public universities has diminished. This decision will mean the loss of potential funding for student programs, scholarships and athletics. I remain committed to finding ways to generate additional financial support for our students and programs, and I hope that students will join me in this effort,” Wong said in the statement.

Coca-ColaeducationPepsiSan Francisco State UniversitySFSUsugary beverages

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