SF settles lawsuit over missing hospital patient Lynne Spalding for nearly $3M

Courtesy photoLynne Spalding disappeared from San Francisco General Hospital on Sept 21

Courtesy photoLynne Spalding disappeared from San Francisco General Hospital on Sept 21

The last chapter in a troubling tale of institutional failure and human error may be at hand.

The city of San Francisco and the family of Lynne Spalding, a San Francisco General Hospital patient who went missing last September and was found dead in a hospital stairwell weeks later, have agreed upon a dollar figure to settle a lawsuit filed by the family.

That number – $2,941,000 — would go to Liam Ford, Simone Ford and the estate of Lynne Spalding.

An item to approve the settlement is expected to be addressed by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday.

If the board approves the settlement, The City will write a check. But that will probably not happen until supervisors meet again after the holidays in January.

Still, similar tragic cases of death have had much higher price tags.

In one case, Christine Svanemyr was run over Sept. 5, 2013 by a Recreation and Park Department truck as she sat with her baby on the grass in a park. San Francisco paid Svanemyr's family $15 million.

For more on this story, pick up a copy of Monday's San Francisco Examiner.

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsLynne SpaldingSan FranciscoSan Francisco General Hospital

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