SF schools open after receiving ‘non-specific’ email threat

SF Examiner photo

SF Examiner photo

San Francisco’s public schools remained open Thursday after receiving what authorities deemed to be a non-credible threat similar to those sent to other large urban school districts in the U.S. this week.

Five San Francisco Unified School District employees, including a teacher and secretary, received a threat via email at 9:48 p.m. Wednesday, around the same time that Dallas, Houston, Miami, Orlando and Long Beach school employees also received similar threats, Superintendent Richard Carranza said Thursday.

Those threats followed the closure of the Los Angeles Unified School District’s more than 900 public schools and 187 charter schools Tuesday after a school board member received an email that raised fears of another attack like the deadly shooting in nearby San Bernardino. New York schools also received a threat Tuesday but remained open.

The City’s school leaders were notified early Thursday morning of the emails, and contacted the San Francisco Police Department and FBI counter terrorism officials, said Carranza. No specific schools were mentioned in the threats.

Principals searched their schools for anything suspicious around 7:30 a.m. Thursday, and leaders at all 134 schools reported nothing out of the ordinary. Schools opened on time.

“The lack of specificity in the threat, the similarity…to the other threats received across the country led us to believe that this is an at-mass email that was sent out,” Carranza said. “At this point in time, we have no reason to believe that the threat is credible whatsoever.”

District leaders also notified all private and parochial schools in San Francisco, as well as San Francisco State University, City College of San Francisco and all charter schools of the emails.

San Francisco police increased their presence on campuses in response to the threats Thursday as well.

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

 

(Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file)

(Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file)

Just Posted

Diners at Teeth, a bar in the Mission District, on July 9, 2021. Teeth began using digital menus based on QR code technology in August. (Ulysses Ortega/The New York Times)
QR codes are changing SF bars, restaurants: Should you be concerned?

By Erin Woo New York Times When people enter Teeth, a bar… Continue reading

The football stadium at UC Berkeley, on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. George Kliavkoff, a former top executive at MGM Resorts International, took over the conference at the start of the month. (Jim Wilson/The New York Times)
What’s Ahead for the Pac-12? New commissioner weighs in

‘Every decision we make is up for discussion. There are no sacred cows.’

The California Department of Public Health recommended state residents wear masks indoors, regardless of their vaccination status. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/TNS)
California health officials issue indoor mask recommendation regardless of vaccination status

The California Department of Public Health formally recommended Wednesday that state residents… Continue reading

As the world reeled, tech titans supplied the tools that made life and work possible. Now the companies are awash in money and questions about what it means to win amid so much loss. (Nicolas Ortega/The New York Times)
How tech won the pandemic and now may never lose

By David Streitfeld New York Times In April 2020, with 2,000 Americans… Continue reading

Vlad Tenev, Robinhood’s chief executive, is featured on a screen in Times Square in New York on Thursday, July 29, 2021. Robinhood’s stock opened at $38, the same as its IPO price, and then declined in a sign of investor hesitancy over a company that has attracted regulatory scrutiny. (Sasha Maslov/The New York Times)
Robinhood’s shares fall in public trading debut

By Erin Griffith New York Times Robinhood helped propel a “meme stock”… Continue reading

Most Read