The San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved on Tuesday the purchase of the McDonald’s on Haight Street for $15.5 million. (Courtesy Google Maps)

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved on Tuesday the purchase of the McDonald’s on Haight Street for $15.5 million. (Courtesy Google Maps)

SF reaches $15.5M deal to buy McDonald’s on Haight, build affordable housing

San Francisco has reached a deal to purchase the blighted McDonald’s restaurant on Haight Street for $15.5 million and plans to turn the site into affordable housing, Board of Supervisors President London Breed said Tuesday.

The McDonald’s site at Haight and Stanyan streets is a known public nuisance in the neighborhood and was the scene of a shooting in August. Breed said the purchase is an “incredibly favorable deal for this site” that is several million dollars below market-rate.

“Our intent in purchasing the site is clear,” Breed said while introducing legislation to the Board of Supervisors that will allow San Francisco to move forward with the purchase. “We are going to build 100 percent affordable housing.”

Breed is serving as acting mayor following the sudden death of Mayor Ed Lee, who died early Tuesday after suffering a heart attack at a grocery store in Glen Park. Breed said the proposal was “the last piece of legislation we discussed when we met yesterday.”

In 2015, McDonald’s agreed to increase security at the site and pay San Francisco $40,000 after City Attorney Dennis Herrera threatened to sue following hundreds of complaints over criminal activity at the restaurant.

The restaurant had more calls for service to police than any other restaurant in the area at the time.

Also on Tuesday, supervisors Katy Tang and Peskin introduced a charter amendment that would freeze the amount of funding going into voter-approved set-asides for specific needs during an economic downturn.Politics

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