SF protests continue with Golden Gate Bridge takeover, Mission march and more

Thousands of protestors shut down the southbound lanes of the Golden Gate Bridge to protest police brutality against the Afro-American community and bring attention of the tragic death of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and others killed by law enforcement on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
A protestor keeps her hands up in front of a police line by the California Highway Patrol and San Francisco Sheriffs Department on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
A protestor walks through the empty toll plaza as traffic on the Golden Gate Bridge is halted due to the thousands of protestors peacefully marching against police brutality on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
A driver heading south on US-101 honks in support of Black Lives Matter as thousands flock take over the Golden Gate Bridge on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Protestors cross onto the Golden Gate Bridge by the vista point as traffic is shut down in both directions. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
A Black Lives Matter march filled the pedestrian pathway on the Golden Gate Bridge. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
A protestor stands with hands up in front of a police line held by the CHP and San Francisco Sheriff’s Department on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Protestors take over the Golden Gate Bridge during a peaceful march. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Protestors take over the Golden Gate Bridge during a peaceful march. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
A couple takes a rest during a Black Lives Matter march on the Golden Gate Bridge on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
CHP offices stand guard on the Golden Gate Bridge as thousands of protestors force its temporary closure. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Protestors block and close the Golden Gate Bridge to traffic. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Protestors cross over into southbound lanes of the Golden Gate Bridge. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Kaycen Bradly of Glasgow, Kentucky, who now lives in San Francisco with his girlfriend, shakes hands with a California Highway Patrol officer at the Vista Point on June 6, 2020 in Sausalito, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Protestors take a knee for 8 minutes and 46 seconds on the Golden Gate Bridge to remember George Floyd who died while being detained by Minneapolis Police. Thousands joined the peaceful march on the Golden Gate Bridge and walked the full span into Sausalito on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
(Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Office Rivera with the Golden Gate Bridge Patrol speaks before a Black Lives Matter march across the Golden Gate Bridge. Rivera said the patrol is in full support of BLM and remind the protestors to keep their social distance and not to enter the roadway. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
A protestor keeps her hands up in front of a police line by the CHP and SFSD on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
The California Highway Patrol and San Francisco Sheriffs’s Department hold a line to keep protestors from entering Presidio Parkway after shutting down traffic on the Golden Gate Bridge on June 6, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).

By Nuala Bishari

Eleven days since protests broke out over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky., San Francisco’s actions are still going strong. Four protests took place across the city on Saturday, with thousands turning out to oppose police violence and systemic racism.

By far the largest protest of the day occurred on the Golden Gate Bridge, where thousands squeezed onto the pedestrian path in the wind before eventually taking over all lanes of the roadway.

Earlier in the day, hundreds gathered at Candlestick Park at 10 a.m. for a march led by SEIU 1021 — San Francisco’s Service Employees International Union. Supervisors Hillary Ronen, Dean Preston, Shamann Walton and Matt Haney were in attendance. The march ended with attendees taking a knee for 8 min 46 seconds, as names of those killed by police violence were read out loud.

In Noe Valley, around 100 people gathered with dogs and strollers for a kid-friendly Black Lives Matter solidarity march through the neighborhood.

And at noon a protest organized by the Bay Area chapter of the national group Refuse Fascism convened at 24th and Mission BART plaza for a few short speeches and some chants, before marching to Mission Police Station and back.

The energy of the day’s protests remained high, despite the fact that many attendees already had a recent protest or two under their belt. Lily Sloane, 36, biked from the Sunset to the Refuse Fascism protest in the Mission, the second event she’s attended this week.

“I don’t want to see this movement fizzle out,” she said. “As a white person I’m responsible for staying in it. I would like to see massive reforms to policing, the whole concept and paradigm of it. I would like to see every white person I know — and beyond — doing work on themselves to dismantle white supremacy from the inside.”

Kevin Hosecloth, 24, traveled from Oakland to San Francisco for the Refuse Fascism march through the Mission District. As he chanted, he held a sign that said “13:12” on one side — a code for the popular slogan ACAB, or “All Cops Are Bastards.” On the other was the quote “I yield my time,” sourced from a particularly colorful public comment during an Los Angeles Police Commission meeting earlier this week.

As protests continue across the country, reforms are beginning to take place. On Thursday, Mayor London Breed and Supervisor Shamann Walton joined forces to reallocate an unspecified amount of money from the city’s Police Department to support black communities. And on Friday, several members of the Board of Supervisors introduced “The Right to Protest Safely Act,” which would ban the use by police of rubber bullets, flash bangs, stun grenades, and tear gas as forms of crowd control.

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday also called for new restrictions on the crowd control techniques and the use of “carotid holds,” similar to the one that killed Floyd.

With at least two more protests set to take place in San Francisco Sunday, it appears the momentum of the Black Lives Matter movement isn’t slowing down anytime soon.

As Bay Area comedian Moshe Kasher put it, “A week in and all 4 cops are charged, Minneapolis has banned chokeholds, LA has diverted 150 mil from LAPD budget and you’re wondering why the protests haven’t stopped? What happens two weeks in?”

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