The Port of San Francisco is looking for a new restaurant to take over 40 South Beach Harbor. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

The Port of San Francisco is looking for a new restaurant to take over 40 South Beach Harbor. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

SF Port seeks to fill Pier 40 vacancy with new, ‘family-friendly’ restaurant

After six decades in business, the popular waterfront Filipino eatery SB40 is set to close in October and the Port of San Francisco is searching for a new restaurateur to take over its Pier 40 space.

On Tuesday, the Port Commission approved a Request For Proposals (RFP), beginning the process for a new restaurant offering a preferably “causal, affordable, family-friendly dining experience” and manned by local restaurateurs, to move in.

“We would like to see a full service restaurant open at least six days a week, serving at minimum lunch and dinner,” the Port’s property manager Elsa Lamb said.

She added the space provides a “great opportunity for a restaurant to also serve breakfast,” and serve visitors of the nearby AT&T Park as well as surrounding outdoor parks.

Situated between South Beach Park and the Ferry Building, the 1,630-square-foot-space sits adjacent to the South Beach Harbor on The Embarcadero.

On top of its 58-person seating capacity, the space offers approximately 500 square feet of outdoor dining area, offering seats for another 33 people. Renting at $3.50 per square foot, the space comes with a 10-year lease and “lots of potential for capital investments,” Lamb said.

“There are a lot of tenant improvements we would expect [the new] tenant to make to the bathroom,” Lamb said. “The kitchen also needs updating. You got the bar that sits in the middle of the restaurant… that’s not the best use of space right now.”

Regardless, the space is expected to be in high demand — outreach for the soon-to-be vacant space began a year ago.

One Pier 40 neighbor, Corinne Woods, requested that the Port Commission offer restaurateurs from the Filipino community to take over, and to press the next restaurateur to maintain SB40’s outdoor public restrooms.

“I hope that given the fact that Carmen’s was there so long, that you’re opening this up to the Filipino community,” Woods said. “Carmen’s” was SB40’s original incarnation, named after proprietor Carmen Ferrer Solis.

Proposals for the space must be submitted by November, and the Port Commission is expected to approve a new restaurateur next spring.Planning

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