SF police warn community about jury duty warrant scam

Police are warning the community about a scam involving personal financial information connected to “Failure to Appear” warrants for not participating in jury duty, Officer Grace Gatpandan said in a statement.

In the scam, victims are called and told they can clear the warrants by turning themselves in at a specific location, agreeing to have a sheriff’s deputy come and pick them up or paying over the phone.

The victims are ultimately convinced to clear the warrant over the phone and instructed to load money onto what police call a “green dot” card, Gatpandan said. The victims then give that card information over the phone while the account is being emptied of funds.

The scam concludes with the victim receiving a false court date to finalize the clearing of warrants.

Police said the calls seem convincing because the scammers use victims' actual address and phone number, the names of judges and official office locations.

This is not the way outstanding warrants can be paid.

The Sheriff’s Department Central Warrants Bureau can be contacted at (415) 553-1871 to check on the validity of any warrants a person may think they have.

Anyone with information on these scams is encouraged to call (415) 575-4444 or text TIP411 with “SFPD” at the start of the message.

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