SF plans to invest more in city’s youngest residents

The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously approved the creation of the Infant and Toddler Early Scholarship Fund. (Courtesy photo)

San Francisco is investing more in its youngest residents.

The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously approved legislation introduced by Supervisor Norman Yee to create a so-called Infant and Toddler Early Scholarship Fund, which will be overseen by the Office of Early Care and Education.

“With childcare costing an average of nearly $20,000 per year for family-home or center-based infant and toddler care, as estimated by the Children’s Council, working mothers and their families in San Francisco, especially those living in or near poverty, would greatly benefit from increased financial support to provide access to quality care for-their young children,” Emily Murase, executive director of the Department on the Status of Women, wrote an Oct. 25 letter in support of the fund.

The funding will come through such sources as private-public partnerships. Grants will be allocated from the fund to childcare providers of children ages 3 and under.

“The creation of the Infant and Toddler Early Learning Scholarship Fund will allow us to be intentional in investing strategic dollars where there is the greatest need for high quality services,” Yee said in a September statement.

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