A man dines inside Il Pollaio Restaurant in North Beach on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020. City officials said indoor dining could resume next week if San Francisco reenters the red COVID-19 risk tier. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

A man dines inside Il Pollaio Restaurant in North Beach on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020. City officials said indoor dining could resume next week if San Francisco reenters the red COVID-19 risk tier. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

SF plans to allow indoor dining next week

San Francisco will allow indoor dining to resume next week with restrictions and outdoor dining will no longer have a 10 p.m. closing time, if The City moves into the state’s red tier as is expected.

San Francisco is expected to move out of the state’s most restrictive COVID purple tier Tuesday of next week. More business operations will be allowed the following day, city officials said Wednesday.

Dr. Susan Philip, of the Department of Public Health, said that The City’s goal is to “align with the state’s red tier framework as much as possible, with specific additional safeguards to limit the spread of the virus.” The City has the authority to impose tougher restrictions than what the state’s tier allows, but not more relaxed restrictions.

Starting Wednesday of next week, indoor dining would be allowed to reopen at 25 percent occupancy with no more than 100 people. No more than one household of up to four people per table will be allowed, city officials said

Indoor dining must close by 10 p.m. and remain closed until 5 a.m.

Meanwhile, outdoor dining will no longer have to end at 10 p.m. Six people would allowed be per table from up to three households.

“I am excited that we are going to see some real change in this city,” Mayor London Breed said when noting the business operations and activities that are expected to resume next week.

“Our numbers are moving in the right direction and I am hopeful that together we can reopen safely and get there quicker,” Breed said.

Breed also wrote on Twitter what people should expect will be allowed to resume.

The Golden Gate Restaurant Association, a restaurant advocacy group, issued a statement praising the new guidance.

“We appreciate the thoughtful way that the updated guidance looks clearly at the distinctions between indoor and outdoor dining,” the statement said, adding that the advance notice “will allow our businesses to implement what is needed and be able to bring back staff in a timely manner.”

Philip said that “most retail will be able to open” with a 25 percent capacity limit and “the 10 p.m. closure is no longer going to apply to non-essential retail.”

“Food courts can open to 25 percent capacity with a max of 100 people,” she added.

Bars must remain closed indoors and outdoors unless they serve bona fide meals.

When it comes to fitness, outdoor classes are capped at 25 people. Indoor gyms and fitness centers can reopen at 10 percent capacity. Gym classes like yoga and meditation are allowed at 10 percent capacity. Face coverings are required at all times.

Indoor zoos, museums and aquariums will be allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsCoronavirussan francisco news

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Health care workers in the intensive care unit at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, with Alejandro Balderas, a 44-year-old patient who later died. Even in California, a state with a coronavirus vaccination rate well above average, the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 has nearly doubled in the past two weeks, according to a New York Times database. (Isadora Kosofsky/The New York Times)
Why COVID took off in California, again

‘The good news is: The vaccines are working’

A kayaker on the water at Lake Oroville, which stands at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 in Oroville, Calif. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
A kayaker on the water at Lake Oroville, which stands at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 in Oroville, Calif. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
Facing ‘dire water shortages,’ California bans Delta pumping

By Rachel Becker CalMatters In an aggressive move to address “immediate and… Continue reading

Students practice identifying species in the school garden at Verde Elementary in Richmond during summer camp. (Photo courtesy of Verde Elementary)
Reading, writing and bike riding: How schools spent summer helping students recover from pandemic

By Sydney Johnson EdSource Bicycles typically aren’t allowed on the blacktop at… Continue reading

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission launched a pilot program that offers up to 90 percent discounts on water and sewer bills for eligible customers. (Andri Tambunan/Special to ProPublica)
How does 90% off your water bill sound? Here’s who qualifies

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission announced this week it is launching… Continue reading

Most Read