SF medical marijuana clubs fund gun buyback event

San Francisco's cannabis businesses want illegal guns off the streets — and they're willing to pay for it.

A gun buyback in South of Market this weekend — on the second anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting massacre in Connecticut — is being underwritten by three medical marijuana dispensaries and a prominent marijuana attorney.

South of Market dispensaries The Green Door and Barbary Coast, Tenderloin-area Grassroots and law firm Hallinan & Hallinan contributed $35,000 to provide the funds necessary to buy back the illegal firearms, attorney Brendan Hallinan said Monday.

“It's giving back a little bit to law enforcement, contributing to public safety,” Hallinan said. “And pot clubs are often accused of creating crime, of causing robberies. … We wanted to counter that a little bit.”

The buyback is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at nonviolence advocates United Playaz, 1038 Howard St.

Anyone turning in a handgun will receive $100. Assault weapons will fetch $200. All guns are accepted, no questions asked by law enforcement.

Afterward, a vigil to commemorate the second anniversary of the Sandy Hook massacre will take place at U.N. Plaza at 2 p.m.

Gun buybacks in The City have proven successful, though finding funding has always been a question. Some buybacks have relied on public funds, while others have used crowdsourcing.

It's believed this is the first time businesses dealing in marijuana have funded a gun buyback.

“We want to participate in society, we want to contribute,” said Mike Nolin, the founder of The Green Door and CEO of medical cannabis consulting firm Boss Enterprises.

Bay Area NewsGreen DoorGun buy backUnited Playaz

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