A woman rides a Jump Bike along Market Street. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

SF may fine Uber’s Jump bike repair shop for violating city code

An Uber-run e-bikeshare repair shop in the Marina District has neighbors fuming and may result in city fines.

The San Francisco Planning Department “has received multiple complaints about noise, double parking, and blocking of neighborhood driveway by the Jump bikes employees at all hours,” according to a complaint filed against the property, 1776 Green Street, in the Marina.

The planning department also found the motorized e-bike repair shop, used to clean, charge, repair and store Uber’s new Jump e-bikes, in violation of planning code because it’s operating in a space permitted for a car repair shop.

But the Jump “bikeshare” repair shop isn’t available for use by the public, and since it is for private use it requires a different permit, according to the planning department. If Uber does not apply for a different permit the billion-dollar company may face fines up to $250 per day.

“Jump plans to cease nighttime operations and we will continue working with the Planning Department to address any concerns,” an Uber spokesperson wrote, in a statement to the San Francisco Examiner.

Uber announced it would acquire Jump, the bikeshare company, in April. The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency is allowing the dockless e-bikes to operate in The City in an 18-month pilot program, which now sees 500 of the iconic red bikes crisscrossing The City, as well as 50 bikes that are only allowed to operate in the Presidio, which borders the Marina district where Uber’s repair shop is located.

That shop is used “24 hours every day,” according to the planning department, a manner “deemed to be a change in use” from the retail auto repair use the area was permitted for. The late night and early morning operations are also causing a “disturbance to nearby neighbors” which is also a violation of planning code, the department said, as the district is not zoned for any building use which “by reason of its nature or manner of operation creates conditions that are offensive” by means of odor, fumes, smoke, cinders, dust, gas, vibration, glare, refuse, water-carried waste, or excessive noise,” according to planning code.

Uber hosted at least two community meetings to hear from neighbors. Sources told the Examiner those neighbors were far from happy.

Even if Uber does come into compliance with planning permits, planning code may mean it legally must restrict its hours of operations since it’s located in a residential district, according to the planning department complaint.

Uber has 15 days from Monday to correct the violations with the planning department.

joe@sfexaminer.com

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