Chase Center, the Warriors’ highly anticipated waterfront arena in San Francisco, is on pace to open for the beginning of the 2019-20 NBA season. (Courtesy Chase Center)

Chase Center, the Warriors’ highly anticipated waterfront arena in San Francisco, is on pace to open for the beginning of the 2019-20 NBA season. (Courtesy Chase Center)

SF judge rules against opponents of Warriors’ proposed arena in Mission Bay

A San Francisco Superior Court judge has ruled against a group seeking to block the Golden State Warriors’ proposed arena project in Mission Bay neighborhood, clearing the way for the project to proceed, according to city officials.

The ruling by Judge Garrett Wong on Monday rejected without comment lawsuits filed in December and January by the Mission Bay Alliance challenging The City’s environmental review and approval process for the event center and mixed-use development at 16th and 3rd streets.

In particular, the group — reportedly comprised of University of California at San Francisco donors, stakeholders, physicians and faculty members — argued the 11-acre project would create major traffic and emergency access issues for the nearby UCSF Medical Center, especially on game days. The lawsuit was joined by the group Save Muni and Jennifer Wade, the mother of a UCSF patient concerned about emergency access for her son.

The Board of Supervisors in December unanimously approved the project, which will include an 18,000-seat event center and 600,000 square feet of office space, in December. The project was also certified as an Environmental Leadership Project by Gov. Jerry Brown, indicating it met economic stimulus and environmental building standards.

Warriors majority owner Joe Lacob said earlier this month that the team expects to break ground “late this year, early next year.”

“The fact is that this worthwhile project has been thoroughly scrutinized under the law, and it has won overwhelming support every step of the way, from all parts of San Francisco — including its neighbors,” City Attorney Dennis Herrera said.

Mayor Ed Lee said the ruling validated The City’s environmental review process.

“The Warriors are inspiring a new generation of fans throughout the Bay Area, and I can’t wait to welcome them back home to San Francisco,” Lee said.

Litigation by the Mission Bay Alliance prompted the Warriors to announce earlier this year that the planned opening date of the arena was being delayed from 2018 to 2019.

Team president and chief operating officer Rick Welts today said the team looked forward to breaking ground soon.

“This decision brings us a huge step closer to building a new state-of-the-art sports and entertainment venue, which will add needed vitality to the Mission Bay neighborhood and serve the entire Bay Area extremely well,” Welts said in a statement.

The alliance also filed a lawsuit in December in Alameda County Superior Court alleging that UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood did not have the legal authority to sign a memorandum of understanding with the Warriors agreeing to traffic mitigations for the project. That lawsuit is still being litigated.

The Mission Bay Alliance has not responded to a request for comment.

The Warriors announced in January that the arena will be known as the Chase Center, after financial services firm JPMorgan Chase paid for naming rights for 20 years.

Examiner staff contributed to this report.Chase CenterdevelopmentGolden State WarriorsJoe LacobPlanningSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott listens at a rally to commemorate the life of George Floyd and others killed by police outside City Hall on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Will the Biden Administration help SF speed up police reform?

City has struggled to implement changes without federal oversight

Lowell High School (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Students, families call for culture shift at Lowell after racist incident

District to explore changes including possible revision of admissions policy

Alan Wong was among California National Guard members deployed to Sacramento to provide security the weekend before the presidential inauguration. (Courtesy photo)
CCSF board member tests positive for COVID-19 after National Guard deployment

Alan Wong spent eight days in Sacramento protecting State Capitol before Inauguration Day

Due to a lack of votes in his favor, record-holding former Giant Barry Bonds (pictured at tribute to Willie McCovey in 2018) will not be entering the National Baseball Hall of Fame in the near future.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Ex-Giants star Barry Bonds again falls short of Hall of Fame

After striking out yet again in his bid to join Major League… Continue reading

San Francisco firefighter Keith Baraka has filed suit against The City alleging discrimination on the basis of race and sexual orientation.<ins></ins>
Gay black firefighter sues city for discrimination

A San Francisco firefighter who says he was harassed and discriminated against… Continue reading

Most Read