Students exit George Washington High School in San Francisco’s Richmond District Friday, May 20, 2016. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)

SF high schools could soon offer more CCSF courses

For the first time, high school students in the San Francisco Unified School District could soon earn college credit for courses they take during the school day.

Under a partnership up for approval today at the Board of Education, City College of San Francisco would offer courses at five high schools next semester in subjects ranging from hospitality to finance. Students would earn credit from both school districts.

The courses are part of a larger push from the SFUSD and CCSF to increase dual-enrollment opportunities, according to Board of Education President Matt Haney. Just 29 SFUSD students took classes at CCSF in summer 2015 compared to 243 students this past summer.

“Some students may not be engaged in their coursework in high school but may find courses in City College that they love,” Haney said.

The CCSF Board of Trustees has already signed onto the deal, which could help the college chip away at its student enrollment woes.

CCSF has lost the equivalent of 15,000 full-time students since the 2011-12 school year, when the college’s accreditor first indicated that CCSF could lose its accreditation, according to Board of Trustees President Rafael Mandelman.

State funding for the college is based on Full-Time Equivalent Students, and CCSF is in fiscal trouble if it cannot improve its enrollment in the coming years. Stability funding that has stood in for its lack of students is expiring after this school year.

The college could recover about 220 students through eight courses taught by CCSF instructors at George Washington, John O’Connell, Balboa, and Abraham Lincoln high schools as well as Phillip and Sala Burton Academic High School, according to the agreement.

However, those students would only be the equivalent of some 12 full-time students for CCSF, representing just a “baby step” toward solving CCSF’s enrollment crisis, Mandelman said.

“This is small, but I think our hope is that over time our relationship with the SFUSD” will grow, Mandelman said.

There are 16,000 high school students in the SFUSD that could help boost the college’s enrollment through dual-enrollment or other means, like recovery courses to earn back credit for courses previously failed.

CCSF also wants to recruit the 1,200 SFUSD graduates a year who do not attend four-year universities or community college, according to the college.

If approved, the SFUSD would offer hospitality and tourism courses at Washington High, first-aid training at Burton and O’Connell high schools, an interpersonal speech course at Balboa and an international business course at Lincoln.

The agreement would automatically renew at the end of June for three years.

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