Mayor London Breed speaks at a news conference across from the Moscone South COVID-19 Vaccination Site to announce people age 50 and older are now eligible to be vaccinated on Thursday, April 1, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Mayor London Breed speaks at a news conference across from the Moscone South COVID-19 Vaccination Site to announce people age 50 and older are now eligible to be vaccinated on Thursday, April 1, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

SF expects to vaccinate 80% of adults with first dose by next month

Officials warn residents to stay vigilant as cases slowly rise

San Francisco is expected to have 80% of adults get their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by mid-May, Mayor London Breed said Thursday.

But hitting that milestone depends on San Francisco receiving a steady and increasing number of doses when supply is limited across the nation.

The City is already on track to vaccinate 50% of adults with at least the first dose by this week.

As of Wednesday, 46% of residents aged 16 and over, or 350,678, have received their first dose of the vaccine. About 82% of residents 65 and older have received at least their first dose and 62% are fully vaccinated.

“By mid-May we expect to be at 80%,” Breed said. “So we are moving right along.”

But the effort to vaccinate everyone has been slowed by a lack of supply. And as those eligible to receive the vaccine expanded Thursday to age 50 and over, health officials said appointments may be hard to come by.

Colfax said The City has the infrastructure in place to vaccinate at least 20,000 residents daily.

“If we have sufficient supply to achieve our capacity we could have over 80% of adults vaccinated with first doses by mid-May,” Colfax said.

Supply is expected to increase.

According to the state, California anticipates receiving 2.4 million doses next week, an increase of 300,000 from this week. Later this month, the state expects to receive 3 million doses weekly.

As vaccinations increase and cases have dropped to an average of about 30 per day, San Francisco is opening more business activity. But with the increased activity, cases have started to rise.

Until herd immunity is achieved through fully vaccinating residents, Colfax said “the virus will always have the possibility of surging again.”

“By no means are we out of the woods yet and cases in San Francisco have slowly started to climb again,” Colfax said. “Now we are still at a low rate, but just in the last week we have seen an increase of 20 % in our case rate. This is not unexpected, we know as cities reopen, including in San Francisco, cases gradually go up.”

Colfax and Breed both emphasized the importance of residents continuing to follow the guidelines to slow the spread of the virus including by wearing masks and socially distancing.

“I know we do not want to see a significant fourth surge here,” Colfax said. “We are seeing alarming conditions in other parts of the country.”

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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