Supervisor Catherine Stefani introduced a gun violence resolution condemning the National Rifle Association after a July mass shooting in Gilroy (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

SF declares the National Rifle Association ‘a domestic terrorist organization’

Gun group dismisses move as ‘worthless and disgusting’ ‘soundbite remedy’ to violence

The Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a resolution declaring the National Rifle Association a domestic terrorist organization and called on other cities to follow suit, prompting the gun rights group to denounce the act as a “worthless and disgusting ‘soundbite remedy’ to the violence.”

Supervisor Catherine Stefani, who has made gun control a top priority in elected office, introduced the resolution, which the 11 board members approved Tuesday.

“It is time to rid this country of the NRA and call them out for who they really are,” Stefani told her colleagues.

Her office issued a statement Wednesday about the vote.

“This country is terrorized by gun violence, and we need to call the NRA what it is: a domestic terrorist organization,” Stefani said. “Nobody has done more to fan the flames of gun violence than the NRA.”

“The NRA exists to spread pro-gun propaganda and put weapons in the hands of those who would harm and terrorize us,” Stefani said. “By any definition, the NRA is a domestic terrorist organization.”

The NRA blasted the Board of Supervisors vote in a statement Wednesday to the San Francisco Examiner.

“This is just another worthless and disgusting ‘soundbite remedy’ to the violence epidemic gripping our nation. The same kind of attack the NRA has confronted in New York,” said NRA spokeswoman Amy Hunter. “This is a reckless assault on a law-abiding organization, its members, and the freedoms they all stand for. We remain undeterred – guided by our values and belief in those who want to find real solutions to gun violence.”

Stefani’s statement notes that the U.S. Department of Justice defines terrorist activity as the use of any “firearm, or other weapon or dangerous device, with intent to endanger, directly or indirectly, the safety of one or more individuals” and any member of an organization that “commits an act that the actor knows, or reasonably should know, affords material support, including communications, funds, weapons, or training to any individual has committed or plans to commit a terrorist act.”

The resolution was introduced after an attack on July 28, 2019 that made Gilroy, California the 243rd community in the United States to experience a mass shooting.

Since then, Stefani said, we have seen “more carnage across this country” with mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, Dayton, Ohio, and Odessa, Texas.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

SF Pride membership votes to ban Google from parade. Will the board listen?

San Francisco Pride’s membership voted Wednesday night to kick Google out of… Continue reading

Police Commission urges SF to address homelessness with health workers instead of cops

Resolution calls on Mayor London Breed, Board of Supervisors to pursue a new approach

California, 13 other states sue to stop Trump’s food stamp cuts

By Jackie Botts, CalMatters Fourteen states, including California, filed suit Thursday against… Continue reading

49ers Emmanuel Sanders will suit up Sunday for his third championship game

As a rookie out of SMU, the 5-foot-11 receiver wasn’t afraid of the biggest moment at that point of his young NFL career.

Supervisor Sandra Fewer won’t run for re-election

Well, there it is. After four years of fighting for the Richmond… Continue reading

Most Read