SF bars reopen for first time in more than a year

Melanie Herrera and Dearbhla O’Neill enjoy a beer inside Maggie McGarry’s Bar in North Beach after bars are allowed to reopen at 25-percent capacity on Thursday May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)Melanie Herrera and Dearbhla O’Neill enjoy a beer inside Maggie McGarry’s Bar in North Beach after bars are allowed to reopen at 25-percent capacity on Thursday May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Melanie Herrera, Dearbhla O’Neill and Jerome Bishop enjoy a drink inside Maggie McGarry’s Bar in North Beach after San Francisco entered the Yellow Tier, allowing to reopen at 25-percent capacity on Thursday May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)Melanie Herrera, Dearbhla O’Neill and Jerome Bishop enjoy a drink inside Maggie McGarry’s Bar in North Beach after San Francisco entered the Yellow Tier, allowing to reopen at 25-percent capacity on Thursday May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Logan Hesse prepares a cocktail at Tupelo bar in North Beach on Thursday, May 6, 2021 after The City entered the Yellow Tier, allowing bars to reopen at 25-percent capacity. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)Logan Hesse prepares a cocktail at Tupelo bar in North Beach on Thursday, May 6, 2021 after The City entered the Yellow Tier, allowing bars to reopen at 25-percent capacity. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Employees at Tupelo bar prepare to host indoor live music on Thursday, May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)Employees at Tupelo bar prepare to host indoor live music on Thursday, May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
People sit at the bar at Showdown SF in North Beach on Thursday, May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)People sit at the bar at Showdown SF in North Beach on Thursday, May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
The Showdown SF bar in North Beach allows patrons to sit inside and drink for the first time in over a year on Thursday, May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/Special to the S.F. Examiner)The Showdown SF bar in North Beach allows patrons to sit inside and drink for the first time in over a year on Thursday, May 6, 2021. (Jordi Molina/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

San Francisco bars reopened for indoor service Thursday after The City moved into the state’s least restrictive COVID-19 yellow tier.

New rules that took effect Thursday allow bars to reopen at up to 25 percent capacity,with a maximum of 100 people. Patrons must be seated at tables at tables of up to eight people to drink.

The City is also allowing the reopening of indoor ice and roller skating, arcades and golf at up to 50 percent capacity.

Bowling alleys and pool halls can operate at up to 50 percent of capacity, and vaccination and testing requirements have been removed. Offices can increase capacity from 25 percent to 50 percent, but vaccinated employees do not count toward the capacity limit.

Restaurants will no longer have a three households per table limit for indoor dining. A 50 percent capacity limit will remain in place, but the cap of 200 patrons will be lifted.

Face coverings are no longer required for outdoor dining once people are seated.

Indoor music venues can increase capacity from 35 percent to 50 percent.

Bay Area Newssan francisco news

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Epic Cleantec uses soil mixed with treated wastewater solids to plants at the company’s demonstration garden in San Francisco. (Photo courtesy of Epic Cleantec)
This startup watches what SF flushes – and grows food with it

Epic Cleantec saves millions of gallons of water a year, and helps companies adhere to drought regulations

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for adolescents in the U.S. (Shutterstock)
Why California teens need mental illness education

SB 224 calls for in-school mental health instruction as depression and suicide rates rise

Ahmad Ibrahim Moss, a Lyft driver whose pandemic-related unemployment benefits have stopped, is driving again and relying on public assistance to help make ends meet. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
How much does gig work cost taxpayers?

Some drivers and labor experts say Prop. 22 pushed an undue burden on to everyday taxpayers.

Affordable housing has become the chief expense for most California students, such as those attending community college in San Francisco. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
California commits $500 million more to student housing

Called ‘a drop in the bucket,’ though $2 billion could be made available in future years

Most Read