SF awarded by EPA for leadership in green-power generation

With Election Day just two weeks away, there is nothing Mayor Gavin Newsom wants more than another “green” accolade to wave at voters.

The mayor announced Wednesday that San Francisco was awarded the 2010 Green Power Leadership Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its in-city generation of green energy.

The EPA award recognizes the country’s leading green-power generators and purchasers for their commitment to clean energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

San Francisco is a leader in on-site green power generation, using more than 25 million kilowatt-hours annually from its biogas facilities and nine municipal solar installations. These solar installations are located on nine facilities and rooftops throughout The City, including The City’s largest reservoir and the San Francisco International Airport.

San Francisco is soon set to begin generating up to 5 megawatts of solar energy at the Sunset Reservoir Solar Array at what will be California’s newest and largest municipal solar project, with nearly 24,000 solar panels.

“San Francisco’s commitment to clean energy is producing green jobs and real benefits for our city today,” Newsom said. “The economic advantages of a green economy are very tangible and we can feel the effects of clean energy in the air we breath; with each solar panel, day-by-day, we’re fueling San Francisco’s transformation into a green economy powered by increasingly clean, renewable energy.”

Green power is electricity that is generated from clean, renewable resources like solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, biomass and low-impact hydro. These resources generate electricity without emitting carbon dioxide emissions. The alternative brown-power options, i.e., coal, natural gas and nuclear, are harmful to the environment and generate carbon pollution and or radioactive waste.

esherbert@sfexaminer.com

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