SF attorney files wrongful death lawsuits against PG&E on behalf of fire victims

A San Francisco attorney has filed wrongful death lawsuits alleging negligence against PG&E on behalf of the families of a Mendocino County couple who died in a wildfire in Redwood Valley last month.

Attorney Mary Alexander’s suit in San Francisco Superior Court Wednesday claims PG&E failed to maintain electrical equipment, trees and vegetation to prevent contact with electric power lines.

The couple who lived together were unable to escape their burning home, and the man died trying to save the woman, according to Alexander’s spokesperson Robert Weiner.

Alexander is representing 17 plaintiffs in suits filed last week for gross negligence, according to a news release.

The complaint alleges downed power lines sparked and caused fires to untrimmed vegetation and trees located close to the power lines in Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino and Butte counties.

The fires in Northern California killed 43 people, 23 of them in Sonoma County.

Other lawsuits alleging PG&E’s negligence caused fire-related property damage and deaths have been filed in San Francisco.

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Diners at Teeth, a bar in the Mission District, on July 9, 2021. Teeth began using digital menus based on QR code technology in August. (Ulysses Ortega/The New York Times)
The football stadium at UC Berkeley, on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. George Kliavkoff, a former top executive at MGM Resorts International, took over the conference at the start of the month. (Jim Wilson/The New York Times)
What’s Ahead for the Pac-12? New commissioner weighs in

‘Every decision we make is up for discussion. There are no sacred cows.’

The sidewalk on Egbert Avenue in the Bayview recently was cluttered with car parts, tires and other junk. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
New surveillance effort aims to crack down on illegal dumping

’We want to make sure we catch people who are trashing our streets’

As the world reeled, tech titans supplied the tools that made life and work possible. Now the companies are awash in money and questions about what it means to win amid so much loss. (Nicolas Ortega/The New York Times)
How tech won the pandemic and now may never lose

By David Streitfeld New York Times In April 2020, with 2,000 Americans… Continue reading

Most Read