Seven of eight San Mateo measures close to passing

San Mateo County voters appear to have approved seven of eight measures in Tuesday’s consolidated municipal, school and special district election, according to unofficial voting results.

Measure A is a $48.3 million bond issue for the Burlingame Elementary School District to maintain and repair aging elementary and intermediate schools and update classroom technology. The measure, which required a 55 percent majority for passage, received 64.6 percent of the vote.

Measure B increases South San Francisco’s business license tax by $10 per employee for most businesses, in order to fund the city’s general services such as police, fire, streets and park maintenance and library services. The measure appears to have passed with 72.9 percent of the vote.

Measure C, also in South San Francisco, creates an 8 percent tax on commercial parking customers as an alternative to the current 8 percent business license tax on commercial parking facilities, with proceeds to be used toward the city’s general fund. The measure received 63.1 percent of the unofficial election votes.

Measure D reduces Redwood City residents’ utility users’ tax on telecommunications and video services from 5 percent to 4 percent, while expanding the definition of what is covered under the tax to include more recent technologies. The measure appears to be approved with 80.6 percent of the vote.

Measure E in Redwood City extends the terms of office of the city’s planning commissioner and library board members from three to four years, and would reduce the terms of office of port board members from five to four years. The measure received 81.6 percent.

Measure F in San Bruno would impose an additional half-cent sales tax for the city’s general fund, raising the city’s salestax to 8.75 percent. The measure received a split vote at 1,934 votes for and 1,934 votes against. If the current unofficial tally stands, the measure, which requires a majority vote, will not pass.

Measure G increases the Menlo Park Fire District’s spending limit from $25 million to $40 million for four years. The district oversees Menlo Park, East Palo Alto, Atherton and some unincorporated areas of San Mateo County. The measure received 74 percent of the vote.

Measure H replaces a current special tax on property in the Colma Fire Protection District with a new, increased special tax on property. The tax would be used for fire and emergency medical services in the district. Residents ages 65 and over would be exempted. The measure, which required a two-thirds majority vote for passage, appears to stand with 67.2 percent of the vote.

— Bay City News

Bay Area NewsLocal

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