Sentencing delayed in Redwood City slaying

Sentencing for a 26-year-old man convicted of first-degree murder for fatally shooting another man in 2006 after an argument at an East Palo Alto birthday party was continued in San Mateo County Superior Court today and may be further delayed when a newly hired defense attorney seeks a new trial.

Quindale Powell, of East Palo Alto, was found guilty May 1 of shooting Deshawn Stubbs, 24, on Stubbs' birthday in the 1700 block of
Woodland Avenue in East Palo Alto around 10:30 p.m. The shooting occurred after Powell's younger brother Quentin, who was 15 at the time, got into an argument with Stubbs at the birthday party in Stubbs' apartment.

Powell faces a minimum sentence of 50 years to life in prison, according to the San Mateo County District Attorney's Office. Sentencing for Powell was scheduled for Friday but a motion filed last week sought to substitute defense attorneys and continue the sentencing.

Joe O'Sullivan, a private attorney out of San Francisco, has taken over Powell's case and will file a motion for a new trial at the continued sentencing hearing Nov. 7, O'Sullivan said today.

O'Sullivan said Powell feels he was not given a fair trial and, if the motion for a new trial is denied and Powell is sentenced, O'Sullivan will file an appeal. In the meantime, his client remains in custody on no-bail status.

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