Sen. Mark Leno joins coalition against Proposition B

A state senator and assemblywoman have joined a coalition of politicians who oppose a controversial San Francisco budget reform measure on the Nov. 2 ballot.

Sen. Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, and Assemblywoman Fiona Ma, D-San Francisco, are raising concerns about Proposition B, a measure that would increase both the health care and pension contributions of some 26,000 city workers.

The measure, proposed by Public Defender Jeff Adachi, has drawn the opposition of labor groups that claim the measure’s proposed increase to city workers’ dependent health care contributions is unfair to working families.

Leno said in a phone interview Tuesday morning that the measure is inherently flawed.

“It’s really a stake in the heart of collective bargaining,” he said. “Benefits that are negotiated can only be reversed through further negotiation, otherwise there is no good-faith bargaining.”

Adachi has said Prop. B could save The City — which had to close a $482 million deficit this year and faces another $400 million deficit next year — about $120 million annually.

“I don’t believe there will many, if any, cost savings,” Leno asserted. “There will only be cost shifts.”

Leno said that if workers are unable to pay for their children’s health care, visits to the county hospital and the emergency room will increase.

“I’d say it’s a simple-minded, one-dimensional idea, in a complex, three-dimensional world,” Leno said.

Leno and Ma are scheduled to speak against the measure at a noon event Tuesday at Laguna Honda Hospital, along with supervisors David Chiu, Ross Mirkarimi and Carmen Chu.

Mayor Gavin Newsom, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Assemblywoman Tom Ammiano have also signed on in opposition.

Prop. B campaign spokeswoman Darcy Brown has said some elected officials oppose the measure because they need the political support of labor unions.

Former Mayor Willie Brown and former Supervisor Matt Gonzalez have come out in support of Prop. B.

Bay Area NewsLocalNEP

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The admissions process at the academically competitive Lowell High School is set to change this year due to coronavirus restritions. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Lowell’s selective admissions process put on hold this year — and more changes may be in the works

School board votes unanimously to use normal student assignment lottery for competitive school

Dr. Vincent Matthews, superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, said Tuesday that student would not be back in school before the end of this calendar year. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Superintendent: City schools will not reopen before the end of the year

San Francisco public schools won’t reopen to students for the rest of… Continue reading

San Francisco has failed to reduce traffic deaths enough to meet its Vision Zero goal. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco not on track to meet Vision Zero goals by 2024

Hamstrung by state laws, dwindling budget and limited resources, SFMTA tries to chart path forward

San Francisco will allow bars selling drinks, and not food, to begin serving customers outdoors under health guidelines going into effect next month. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF becomes first Bay Area County to move to least restrictive COVID-19 category

Change to ‘yellow’ will allow more indoor dining and fitness, reopening non-essential offices

City officials want to install more red light cameras but the process is costly and time consuming. (Shutterstock)
Transit officials push for more red light cameras

SFMTA says ‘capital crunch’ and dragging timelines make expanding the program cumbersome

Most Read