Selvege denim entrepreneur embraces guerilla tactics

Hong Kong native Daniel Cheong’s new selvage-denim line Guerilla Twenty Four has made its U.S. debut in its first “WEWEREHERE”
pop-up store, available at Harputs in Union Square until Oct. 21. For more information, visit www.guerilla24.com.


What was your inspiration for Guerilla Twenty Four?
It is in my genes I suppose. My family was an old textile and jeans manufacturer, but the business faded over time, and I’m sort of reviving the family tradition.  

Where did the name come from? It comes from the guerilla tactics that I’m trying to use to sell my clothes. I’ll be popping up at different locations at different times of the year to sell them. I know it’s a bit against the old rule book of brick-and-mortar shops, but I think if I do this right, I can go to my customers at the right time in the right location.  

What kinds of clothes do you produce?
Well-crafted men’s basics — selvage denim, hand-printed tees and sweatshirts. We make every tee and denim using as little machinery as possible.

Why are you bringing the brand to San Francisco?
It is only fitting to go to the birth place of denim and the home to the most famous brand of jeans of all time. Plus, San Franciscans seem receptive to new ideas and new brands.

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