Seattle man’s scarring S.F. trip

The 49ers had some good hits in Sunday’s game against the Seahawks, but this one would surely be penalized.

Keith Gustin, a 40-year-old network operation supervisor from Puyallup, Wash., has a fractured bone above his lip and a missing tooth in what he says was a sucker punch by a Niners fan after Sunday’s game in San Francisco.

Gustin is a die-hard fan who attended his first Seahawks game in 1976. He has earned the nickname “Rooster” for the white and blue mask he wears to home games, complete with Mardi Gras beads and a Seahawks uniform emblazoned with the number 12.

He was at a bar near Fisherman’s Wharf on Sunday, where he says a couple of rowdy 49ers fans were cut off from alcohol. Gustin asked the two men why they were in such a foul mood and they said that they had to ditch their 49ers jerseys earlier in the day because police were searching for them.

As Sunday night turned to Monday morning, Gustin says he went to a nearby Denny’s for a coffee. Wearing a Seahawks visor, he went out for a smoke with another Seattle fan and the same two men he had seen earlier walked toward them.

“Two guys come up, and one guy with a beard put his hand out like he wanted to shake hands,” Gustin said. “I reached my hand out and the next thing I know, boom, and I’m in the bushes.”

Instead of running after the men, Gustin gave a report to two police officers eating inside Denny’s before traveling by ambulance to the emergency room.

Gustin, who says he has not spoken to the Police Department since the attack, went to Seattle media with his story.

“I love The City,” he told The Examiner. “I love the town. I’ll come back again, but not for a football game.”

As far as the attack goes, police are a little wary of Gustin’s account, according to police Sgt. Wilfred Williams.

“Our investigators are in the process of getting in touch with [Gustin] about a few discrepancies in his account to media and his account to police,” Williams said.

Police do not have a suspect in the attack in custody.

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