School district property could go up for sale

The public will have the chance Tuesday to weigh in on whether the San Mateo Union High School District should lease or sell one of its campuses.

Crestmoor High School in San Bruno could be deemed as surplus, according to a committee formed last spring to determine what district-owned property is currently not needed.

The 41-acre property that was Crestmoor High School was closed in 1980 due to a decline in district enrollment. Since then, it has housed the district’s continuation school, Peninsula High School.

An assessment more than two years ago estimated the Crestmoor site’s value at $80 million to $120 million, the district’s budget director told The Examiner in April.

The San Mateo Union High School District served more than 13,000 students in seven comprehensive high schools in 1970; today, there are 8,500 students, according to district documents.

Due to budget deficits, the district’s board was forced to cut $6 million from its $98 million annual budget for this fiscal year.

The public hearing will be held at Capuchino High School on Tuesday at 7 p.m.

A presentation on the committee’s findings is expected to be given to the board of trustees at its Dec. 10 meeting. After the presentation the board could make a decision on the fate of the properties or decide to hold additional public hearings, according to the district’s superintendent, Scott Laurence.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area Newseducationhigh schoolLocalSan Mateo

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