Ja’Mari Oliver, center, and his Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy classmates protested outside the Safeway at Church and Market streets on Wednesday. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Ja’Mari Oliver, center, and his Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy classmates protested outside the Safeway at Church and Market streets on Wednesday. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

School community rallies behind Black classmate stopped at Safeway

‘When you mess with one of us, you mess with all of us’

Dozens of children and community members on Wednesday rallied to support a Black classmate who was stopped by Safeway staff last week and accused of stealing.

Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy families organized the protest at Safeway on behalf of Ja’Mari Oliver, a fifth-grader who attends the close-knit public school. One child shouted “Safeway is not safe,” a sentiment repeated in chants and on posters.

Last week, 11-year-old Ja’Mari bought a sandwich at the Safeway on Market and Church streets to eat at his school, located nearby. On his way out, three grocery store workers stopped him and questioned whether he had paid for the food.

Parents and students at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy protested outside the Safeway at Church and Market streets on Wednesday after a classmate was accused of stealing. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Parents and students at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy protested outside the Safeway at Church and Market streets on Wednesday after a classmate was accused of stealing. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Though Ja’Mari showed his receipt, he said was still stopped from exiting until the store manager told him he could go. The emotional damage was immediate.

“It made me feel sad,” Ja’Mari said on Wednesday. “I felt scared, like something could happen. I was just crying.”

School staff noticed a “change in his demeanor” that day and asked him what happened, said third-grade teacher Ryan Swick. When staff went to the store the next morning, he said they were met with hostility themselves.

“He was very shaken up, not his usual self at school,” Swick said. “Kids are aware that this kind of stuff happens. You don’t think it happens to someone in your community until it happens to someone in your community.”

Emmanuel Stewart, principal at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy, speaks to parents and students. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Emmanuel Stewart, principal at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy, speaks to parents and students. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

A Safeway representative confirmed that third-party security guards asked for a receipt and eventually Ja’Mari left the store with his mother. Those involved have been “removed” from the store, said spokesperson Wendy Gutshall.

“The store manager was unaware of what happened until the young man returned to the store with his mother,” Gutshall said in an email. “He extended our most sincere apologies for the boy’s unsettling experience. While our internal investigation is ongoing, we can tell you that this is counter to our policies and training.”

The incident became a learning lesson for the school and was incorporated into inquiry-based lessons as they made posters this week for the rally. Teachers asked students questions such as if they’ve ever been accused of something they didn’t do, how that made them feel, and why they thought it would happen if Ja’Mari had a receipt.

Supervisor Rafael Mandelman also spoke at the protest. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Supervisor Rafael Mandelman also spoke at the protest. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

One Black student of Swick’s pointed out the racism behind Ja’Mari’s experience. In making signs, some students wrote “All colors matter,” which prompted conversation around how it was time to focus on standing against what happened to their fellow classmate, who is Black.

“We don’t just want to focus on the things that can happen to [Black and brown students],” Swick said. “But also, how are we restoring Ja’Mari’s joy? How are we showering him with community to let him know we are with him? When you mess with one of us, you mess with all of us.”

Parents and students at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy march through the Castro. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Parents and students at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy march through the Castro. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Ja’Mari said the rally “makes me feel good” and that he hoped for “better things” going forward.

The school community is still crafting demands and will be meeting with Safeway representatives. At the rally on Wednesday, Rev. Amos Brown spoke and threatened a boycott.

“We’re going to have a come-to-Jesus meeting with them or else we will say ‘We will not shop at Safeway,’” said Brown, who is president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s San Francisco chapter. “We’ve got to teach Safeway a lesson.”

imojadad@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area Newseducationsan francisco news

 

The Rev. Amos Brown threatened a boycott of Safeway at a protest Wednesday. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

The Rev. Amos Brown threatened a boycott of Safeway at a protest Wednesday. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Just Posted

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for adolescents in the U.S. (Shutterstock)
Why California teens need mental illness education

SB 224 calls for in-school mental health instruction as depression and suicide rates rise

Ahmad Ibrahim Moss, a Lyft driver whose pandemic-related unemployment benefits have stopped, is driving again and relying on public assistance to help make ends meet. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
How much does gig work cost taxpayers?

Some drivers and labor experts say Prop. 22 pushed an undue burden on to everyday taxpayers.

Gov. Gavin Newsom, who visited the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 6 headquarters on Recall Election Day, handily won after a summer of political high jinks.	<ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Lessons from a landslide: Key takeaways from California’s recall circus

‘After a summer of half-baked polls and overheated press coverage, the race wasn’t even close’

The Kimpton Buchanan Hotel in Japantown could become permanent supportive housing if The City can overcome neighborhood pushback. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Nimbytown: Will SF neighborhoods allow vacant hotels to house the homeless?

‘We have a crisis on our hands and we need as many options as possible’

Most Read