School board talks about possible mission bay school facility

The school board discussed the necessity of a new school in the Mission Bay area Wednesday night because of 17,000 residential units coming to the neighborhood, but did not come to any conclusions.

The Redevelopment Agency reported to commissioners that about 330 children – the majority too young for school – already live in the area and that their parents are highly interested in public education.

The agency suggested a K-8 school, or K-5, to cater to the younger children.

However commissioners did not draw any conclusions, asking for more data and feedback from the parents.

Superintendent Carlos Garcia also said it would be premature to make any decisions about a new facility before the board decides on a new student assignment plan.

Commissioner Hydra Mendoza requested commissioners make a decision on whether they want a school in two or three years or in five years so they can use money set aside to research its feasibility.

Other commissioners said if they were to develop a school, they strongly uphold one with pre-k.

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