Sandoval drives proposal to tow illegal limousines

Limousine drivers illegally stealing fares from taxi cabs in The City, a problem that authorities say is rampant, could have their wheels swept from under them.

Supervisor Gerardo Sandoval said he plans on introducing legislation in the coming weeks that would allow law enforcement to tow any limo illegally operating in The City.

For years, cab drivers have complained that limousines have been dipping into their livelihood by stealing fares illegally. And with the recent increase in cab fees, gas prices and the number of cabs on city streets, the complaints have increased, according to authorities.

Complaints includes hotel doormen receiving cash in exchange for putting guests into limos and limo drivers removing their license plates so they cannot be ticketed or reported.

Under state law, limousine operators can only carry passengers by prearrangement. But they have been known to prowl city streets and illegally pick up people on the street or illegally wait in hotel taxi stands, according to police and cab drivers. Law enforcement currently faces restrictions when it can tow illegal limos, such as only if the driver had received a citation for the offense in the last year, among others.

“Cabdrivers have been begging you for ages to try and figure out what can we do to solve this problem,” cab driver Barry Taranto told a Board of Supervisors committee Thursday during a hearing on limos illegally picking up passengers.

Sandoval, who requested the hearing, said he wants to “eradicate the illegal limousine practices here in San Francisco.”

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

Just Posted

Badly needed rain cooled off pedestrians on Market Street in The City on Wednesday. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Storm door opens in San Francisco — what will the rains bring?

‘Come Monday, fire season in Northern California should be done’

Newly appointed City Attorney David Chiu will play a key role in an upcoming legal battle between gig economy companies and The City. (Sheila Fitzgerald/Shutterstock)
City Attorney David Chiu faces immediate test in major gig economy lawsuit

DoorDash and Grubhub are suing San Francisco over price controls

FILE — In-N-Out Burger, the popular California fast-food chain, is resisting San Francisco's public health rules that require indoor diners to show proof of vaccination. (J. Emilio Flores/The New York Times)
When it comes to San Francisco vaccine rules, In-N-Out should heed Biblical advice

Burger chain’s vaccine fight distracts from its tasty burgers and French fries controversy

The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Walgreens says it’s closing five SF stores due to crime. Where’s the data?

Walgreens should be transparent, enlighten city leaders about crime’s effect on business

Lake Hennessey, a reservoir for Napa, looked dry in June. Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday issued a proclamation extending the drought emergency statewide and asked residents to redouble water conservation efforts. <ins>(Mike Kai Chen/New York Times)</ins>
Newsom declares drought emergency across California

State closed out its second-driest water year on record

Most Read