San Mateo police investigating creepy guy approaching students at school

San Mateo police are investigating three separate reports of a man acting a bit creepy toward two teenage girls at San Mateo High School and one young woman at nearby San Mateo Adult School.

Police first received a report of a suspicious person Wednesday in an incident that happened Monday near San Mateo High School, Sgt. Rick Decker said.

About 8 a.m., a man was parked across the street from the school on North Delaware Street when a 16-year-old girl walked by him. The man inside the car reportedly said to the girl, “Good morning. Can I ask you a question?” He also urged her to come closer to his vehicle, Decker said. She ignored the man and continued on to school.

On Thursday, police received a similar report of an incident that happened Nov. 6, Decker said. In that incident, a 16-year-old girl parked her car on North Eldorado Street about 9 a.m. when she noticed a man in another car looking at her.

The car drove around the block, returning as the student was getting out of her car.

He reportedly pulled alongside her car and said, “Good morning.” The student reportedly ignored him and walked toward the school.

As she reached the corner of Poplar Avenue and North Delaware Street, he drove up alongside her and asked, “What’s up?” She continued to ignore him and went into school.

About 6:15 p.m. Thursday night, a 19-year-old woman at the San Mateo Adult School in the 700 block of East Poplar Avenue stepped out to the parking lot to take a break when a man in a nearby parked car got out and greeted her, complimenting her on her appearance, Decker said. She ignored the man and he reportedly offered her money to leave with him. She ignored that request and went back into the school and reported the incident about two hours later.

In the first two incidents, the description of the suspicious person is similar. He is described as being an Asian man, possibly Filipino, in his 30s or 40s, Decker said. He is bald with some hair on the sides of his head, driving a four-door light-colored car, possibly a Toyota or Honda.

In the third incident, the man was thought to be Asian, possibly Filipino, in his 30s, with a medium build, short or spiked hair on top and unshaven, Decker said. The vehicle in that incident was a dark blue or black foreign sedan.

Police are continuing to investigate the incidents and said there are enough similarities that it may be the same suspect, Decker said.

Anyone with information on the suspect is encouraged to call police at (650) 522-7650.Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsSan Mateo Adult SchoolSan Mateo High SchoolSan Mateo Police Department

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