San Mateo County sees 20 percent voter turnout

Slightly more than 20 percent of registered voters in San Mateo County went to the polls Tuesday to vote on several ballot measures and elect candidates in municipal and school board races.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting, the county reported 73,026 ballots cast out of 359,535 registered voters. The turnout was a little less than that of San Francisco, where just under 22 percent of registered voters went to the polls.

In San Mateo County, voters approved most of the parcel tax and bond measures benefiting local school districts.

Measure V, a 6.5 percent tax that would have applied to all types of telecommunication in Pacifica to raise funds for police and fire services, was rejected by 66 percent of the city’s voters.

Voters in the San Mateo-Foster City School District rejected Measure P, a $130 million bond measure that would have funded repairs and rebuilding efforts at Knolls Elementary School in San Mateo and Bowditch Middle School in Foster City. The measure needed 55 percent of voter approval to pass, but 53 percent voted no.

All other local measures on the San Mateo County ballot this election were approved.

By approving Measure R, residents in the Belmont-Redwood Shores School District decided to renew two parcel taxes for 10 years. The combined tax will continue to levy $174 per parcel, with an exemption for senior citizens.

Measure R, which needed two-thirds voter approval to pass, won approximately 71 percent of the vote. Residents in the Las Lomitas Elementary School District, which comprises portions of Woodside, Menlo Park, Atherton and Portola Valley, approved Measure S, a $60 million bond measure, with nearly 74 percent of the vote.

Measure W, a $23 million bond measure for the Menlo Park City School District, passed with 75 percent of the vote.

Brisbane residents approved Measure T, an increase on a business license tax for liquid storage facilities. Measure T, which needed a simple majority to pass, was approved by 77 percent.

Measure X, which extended a parcel tax in Atherton for four years, easily won a required two-thirds vote with 74 percent voting yes. The tax will fund police patrols, street repairs and drainage facility maintenance.

Foster City residents easily passed Measure U, a business-license tax that will fund city services such as police, fire, parks, and repairs and maintenance.

In Portola Valley, residents approved Measure Q, which will lower a tax on utilities, with 86 percent of the vote.

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