San Francisco mom facing criminal charges after abandoning drug baby

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerNo interest: After Nneka Nash’s early-morning delivery Wednesday

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerNo interest: After Nneka Nash’s early-morning delivery Wednesday

A new mother is facing criminal charges for reportedly abandoning her baby boy — who tested positive for cocaine — early Wednesday after delivering him on a rain-soaked Bayview district sidewalk.

Nneka Nash, 39, of San Francisco is expected to be arraigned this afternoon on a felony count of willful cruelty to a child and a misdemeanor count of failure to provide care to a child, according to prosecutors. The boy was taken by Child Protective Services, police said.

After handing off the just-under 5-pound newborn to a man in the street, police said, Nash split. The child was unresponsive, but two responding officers have been credited with saving his life. He is making a miraculous recovery, although cocaine was found in the boy’s system when he arrived at the hospital, police said.

The birth reportedly occurred in the pouring rain without medical care at about 2 a.m. It’s unclear whether anyone was with Nash during delivery, police Sgt. John Keane said, as Nash has not been cooperative. Her pregnancy was at full term.

Nash is known to frequent the area, but lives in housing projects in Hunters Point.

After giving birth, a bleeding Nash sought help at the Providence Church Shelter at Third Street and McKinnon Avenue. When shelter workers told her they were going to call 911, Nash reportedly declined help and walked away with the baby.

A man who knows the woman from the neighborhood had reportedly been driving on Third Street when he spotted her carrying the baby. The man told police that Nash had handed him the boy and then left.

The man flagged down two police officers who had been responding to the shelter’s 911 call. The officers called for an ambulance, but determined that it would take too long and the child might not survive. One of the officers drove to a hospital while the other one, who is a former paramedic, performed CPR.

Keane said Nash has a rap sheet, though it’s not very extensive. He would not elaborate on her past.

Police are still investigating the relationship between the mother and the man who she gave the child to. Police said they are searching for him, but know his name. Investigators hope witnesses will come forward.

Anyone with information about the bizarre case is asked to call Keane of the Police Department’s special victims unit at (415) 553-9363.

maldax@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsLocalSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The most dangerous behaviors by drivers include failing to yield right-of-way at crosswalks, unsafe speeding and failing to stop at red lights or stop signs. <ins>(Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>
Changes at SFPUC spark concern, hope

Will agency’s new commissioner continue to support Big Ag?

Supervisor Shamann Walton joined with community members to speak out against rising homicides, which have taken a heavy toll in the Bayview-Hunters Point in 2020. (Samantha Laurey/ Special to S.F Examiner)
SF homicides surpass 2019 total with month left in year

Police attribute rise to COVID-19, shootings and deadly gang violence

A screenshot from SFPD body worn camera
New videos show police shooting man armed with knife, frying pan

Police say Antonio Estrada set fire to apartment building before shooting

Dr. Grant Colfax, director of the Department of Public Health, said he expected San Francisco to enter the purple tier within days.
Chris Victorio/Special to S.F. Examiner
SF still in the red but expects move into purple tier ‘some time soon’

Four more counties moved into highest COVID-19 risk category by state

Most Read