San Francisco mayoral candidates push for last-minute votes

From left

Mayoral candidates hit the streets Saturday, shaking hands, posing for pictures and even serving up a pancake breakfast in an effort to make the most of the last few days before Tuesday’s election.

Now in the home stretch, candidates said they are aiming to spend the remainder of their time in the community so voters can put a face, a voice and a handshake to a name on the ballot.

“It’s visibility and a strong reminder that Nov. 8 is around the corner,” said Mayor Ed Lee, who made the rounds in the Richmond district with a dim sum crawl on Geary Boulevard.

En route to some sticky rice and siumai, Lee was stopped at a street corner by an 80-year-old fan.

When Hui Zhang, 80, spotted Lee from the backseat of a car, she demanded that her daughter pull over.

“We saw him and had to stop,” said Zhang’s daughter Renee Wang.

Other candidates, including Phil Ting, held more formal last hurrahs.

The city assessor hosted a pancake breakfast, complete with fruit, coffee, juice and three kinds of flapjacks. The two-hour event at UC San Francisco’s Millberry Union focused on public transportation and included a chance for people to share their ideas on what needs fixing.

“I’m very impressed he’s made this his No. 1 big cause,” Peg Murphy said. The smorgasbord didn’t convince Murphy that Ting is her candidate, but he’s among her top three choices, she said, adding that she hasn’t decided how she’ll list her picks for ranked-choice voting.

With 16 candidates in the race, Murphy likely isn’t alone in her indecision. On Saturday, volunteers dotted street corners across The City, waving signs, offering pamphlets to anyone who looked at them and doing their best to sway those still uncertain.

But among the most enthusiastic campaigners out and about Saturday were Leland Yee’s supporters, who rode around in a trolley plastered with campaign signs.

The trolley followed the state senator as he popped in and out of businesses along Irving Street; the crew cheered every time he returned to the street.

“What we’ve been talking about is the future of The City,” Yee said.

“They know their future is in peril,” he said, referring to his campaign trolley full of young supporters.

Their energy got at least two new voters on board — literally. The trolley picked up Anthony Balunsat, 24, and Angelica Cardenas, 23, and by the time they dropped them off, both said they planned on voting for Yee.

sgantz@sfexaminer.com

Just Posted

Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence patch things up with leather fair organizers

The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence and organizers of S.F.’s leather fair have patched things up.

Planning Commissioner Rich Hillis steps down to seek role as department head

San Francisco Planning Commissioner Richard Hillis has resigned from his post and… Continue reading

Death on BART tracks prompts major systemwide delay

An unidentified person entered the trackway at Powell Street BART station and was struck by a train.

Federal judge blocks California law to force disclosure of Trump’s tax returns

Sep. 19—SACRAMENTO — A federal judge ordered a temporary injunction Thursday against… Continue reading

SF public defender calls deputy shooting ‘preventable and unnecessary tragedy’

Sheriff identifies four deputies involved in incident that killed dog, allegedly wounded owner

Most Read