San Francisco Bay sand mining raises questions about beach erosion

(Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file photo)

(Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file photo)

The sediment in San Francisco Bay, once thought of as a renewable resource, is eroding and being removed much more quickly than nature replenishes it — which could affect two companies’ requests to increase their sand-mining operations.

Sand has been removed from the Bay for more than 100 years, first for harbors and channels and later for use in construction. For decades it was assumed the sediment was quickly replenished. But new research shows that only 15 percent of the coarse sand mined for construction purposes is replenished.

This decrease in sediment is one cause of coastal erosion, including the southern part of Ocean Beach, which is one of the fastest eroding stretches in the state, said Patrick Barnard, a coastal geologist with the U.S. Geological Society. Such erosion threatens valuable city infrastructure, including Great Highway and a water treatment plant worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

“There has been concern about the connection to the outer coast,” program manager Brenda Goeden of the Bay Conservation and Development Commission said of the relationship between sand mining and beach erosion.

The issue arose Thursday during a commission hearing that considered the latest studies about the movement of sediment through the Bay and how it affects coastal erosion.

Some of this research was highlighted in an environmental study done before two companies, Hanson Aggregates and Jerico Products, can renew sand mining permits on state-owned land in San Francisco and Suisun bays.

Although the California State Lands Commission recently approved the environmental review, the permits now will be reviewed by several local, state and federal agencies, including the commission.

The two companies are asking for a 17.4 percent increase in how much sand they are permitted to remove for a 10-year period.

But Ian Wren, a scientist at San Francisco Baykeeper, pointed out that the rate of sand mining has not decreased proportionately with the amount being replenished.

Sediment flows through the delta, into the Bay and then onto the ocean floor and at beaches south of the bridge, Barnard said. But the amount of sediment ending up on beaches has decreased over time. The main reason is a steady reduction in sediment from Gold Rush-era hydraulic mining techniques, which pulverized the Sierra Nevada mountains. And dams and flood-management projects have reduced the water and sediment flowing through the delta.

Peter Baye, an independent coastal ecology consultant, said companies that mine sand should do so only at a rate of replenishment. Doing so would mean drastically reducing the amount of sand these companies are allowed to remove, he noted.

Other alternatives to mining construction sand from the Bay include mining it from regional land-based sources or increasing the amount imported from places including British Columbia, where it is taken from sediment left behind by retreating glaciers. Both sources could add to greenhouse gas emissions, which leaves environmental groups working to weigh the harms of shipping material from outside of the region and depleting sand in the Bay.

“We don’t want to encourage increased greenhouse gas rates from shipping or importing,” Wren said. But he acknowledged that the sand mining is an unsustainable practice that is also harmful and that a balance of the two is needed.

Representatives from the two companies told the commission Thursday that mining from the Bay is cheaper and more ecological than the alternatives.

Bill Butler of Jerico Products said shipping one barge of sand removes 100 trucks from the roads.

“This resource is valuable,” he said. “Having a local Bay Area source for our local Bay Area needs — one that’s efficiently extracted and then transported by water directly or very close to where it is used — is economically and
environmentally sound.”

mbillings@sfexaminer.com

Proposed changes to mining permit

Hanson Aggregates and Jerico Products are seeking permission to increase the amount of sand they mine from
San Francisco Bay west of Alcatraz Island.

Central Bay lease area
Current limit Average removed 2002-07 Proposed new limit Increase over average
1,390,000 1,141,039 1,540,000 35%
Suisun Bay/Delta lease area
Current limit Average removed 2002-07 Proposed new limit Increase over average
1,490,000 1,226,785 1,840,000 50%

Source: California State Lands Commission

Bay Area Newsbay conservation and development commissionGovernment & PoliticsLocalOcean BeachPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco Police Officer Nicholas Buckley, pictured here in 2014, is now working out of Bayview Station. <ins>(Department of Police Accountability records)</ins>
SF police return officer to patrol despite false testimony

A San Francisco police officer accused of fabricating a reason for arresting… Continue reading

Riordan Crusaders versus St. Ignatius Wildcats at JB Murphy Field on the St. Ignatius Prepatory High School Campus on September 14, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner)
State allows high school sports to resume, but fight is far from over

For the first time since mid-March 2020, there is hope for high… Continue reading

A nurse draws up a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Mission neighborhood COVID-19 vaccine site on Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF expands vaccine eligiblity, but appointments ‘limited’

San Francisco expanded eligibility for COVID-19 vaccinations Wednesday but appointments remain limited… Continue reading

The now-shuttered Cliff House restaurant overlooks Ocean Beach people at Ocean Beach on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)
History buffs working to keep Cliff House collection in public view

Funds needed to buy up historic building’s contents at auction

Perceived supply and demand in the Bay Area’s expensive rental market can play a big part in determining what people pay. (Shutterstock)
Bay Area rental market is rebounding — but why?

Hearing about people leaving town can have as big an effect as actual economic factors

Most Read