San Carlos City Council to reconsider artificial turf

Some members of the City Council aren’t ready to bench the fractious athletic-fields debate, despite public sentiment that it’s time to move on.

The council will reconsider on June 12 whether to add synthetic turf at Heather School after voting May 8 to renovate that field with natural grass. Synthetic turf would cost $1.3 million — compared with $800,000 for natural grass — but add nearly 900 hours of practice time for local teams, according to San Carlos Parks and Recreation Director Barry Weiss.

Turf wars have divided the city, with neighbors fearing increased traffic and noise due to heavier field use squaring off against athletics groups that have to compete for space and playing time. The debate culminated in a yearlong effort by a 28-member committee to develop a plan that would suit everyone. Lewis said Monday night that the City Council’s May 8 vote, which largely ignored the committee’s findings, was “by far the most expensive option with the least efficacy.”

It remains unclear whether the sites where the city is hoping to put synthetic turf — two fields at Tierra Linda Middle School and one at Central Middle School — will actually be made available to them. Rumors that the school district plans to put new buildings on a field site at Tierra Linda aren’t true, according to Ron Little, business official with the San Carlos School District.

City and school officials are tentatively scheduled to discuss those options in mid-June, according to board member Mark Olbert. The city already has permission to use the fields at Heather, which has no school sports teams — but no such agreement for the other schools, which do have teams, Little said.

Meanwhile, community members begged the City Council on Monday to stop rehashing the issue and move on.

“This issue has divided neighborhoods, and the only reason we are still talking about it is because of a few angry voices,” said fields-

committee member Greg Harris, who fought against the addition of synthetic turf and lights at a field near his home. “It’s time to begin the healing.”

bwinegarner@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocalPeninsula

Just Posted

Pharmacist Hank Chen is known for providing personalized service at Charlie’s Pharmacy in the Fillmore.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Left: A Walgreens at 300 Gough St. is among San Francisco stores closing.
Walgreens closures open the door for San Francisco’s neighborhood pharmacies

‘I think you’ll see more independents start to pop up’

San Franciscans are likely to have the opportunity to vote in four different elections in 2022. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Electionpalooza: SF school board recall will kick off a flurry of local races

‘It’s going to be a lot of elections and a lot of decisions for voters to make’

Four young politicos were elected to city government on the Peninsula in 2020. From left: Redwood City Councilmember Michael Smith; South San Francisco Councilmember James Coleman; Redwood City Councilmember Lissette Espinoza-Garnica; and East Palo Alto Councilmember Antonio Lopez.<ins> (Examiner illustration/Courtesy photos)</ins>
Progressive politicians rise to power on the Peninsula. Will redistricting reverse the trend?

‘There’s this wave of young people really trying to shake things up’

The fate of San Francisco nicotine giant Juul remains to be seen, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing whether to allow certain flavored vape products on the market. <ins>(Jeenah Moon/New York Times)</ins>
How the vape king of teen nicotine addiction rose and fell in San Francisco

‘Hey, Juul, don’t let the door hit you on the way out’

Most Read