San Bruno residents tire of unwelcome limos

Limousines and shuttles running service to and from San Francisco International Airport have made the Belle Air neighborhood into a makeshift parking lot, riling residents who blame a parking shortage on these black-suited interlopers.

The main problem: Drivers from local limo companies and airline shuttles are not breaking the law by parking on the street for an extended period of time, though it may be irritating to residents. But the San Bruno Police Department is looking into possible ways to give officers more recourse in ticketing these drivers.

San Bruno police Chief Neil Telford said the department is considering amending the local vehicle code to give officers more power in the matter.

The department is currently doing research into how other cities have handled the overflow of limos and shuttles into neighborhoods, Telford said.

Telford said the police have no ability to ticket these drivers as long as a car is not blocking a driveway, is an appropriate weight for the street, is within 18 inches of the curb and is not obstructing views that could interfere with other vehicles’ safety.

Drivers of limos and airline shuttles, who have to pay fees for operating on airport property, have flocked to the Belle Air streets between chauffeuring assignments to avoid the payments and park in the eastern San Bruno neighborhood, which abuts southbound Highway 101. Drivers typically head to the quieter neighborhood during the daytime hours of peak business at SFO.

The San Bruno police log shows complaint calls over the last several weeks reporting drivers who were spotted by residents in the Belle Air neighborhood, including the 800 and 1100 blocks of Kains Avenue.

Resident Jacqueline Farley said the drivers have been a nuisance since she moved into the neighborhood about seven years ago.

Police have told her for years that their hands were tied, but she said any efforts to give the police more authority to ticket the drivers were welcome.

“Some of [the drivers] are rude,” Farley said. “Many of them smoke outside, wash their cars or just sit in the back seat and take a nap.”

Approximately five black, dark-tinted sedans were spotted recently parked or driving in and around the 500 and 600 blocks of Fifth, Sixth and Seventh avenues in Belle Air. Drivers declined to comment on the issue.

tramroop@examiner.com

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