San Bruno readies plan to curb traffic near schools

City engineers expect to have a traffic-calming plan ready next month, welcome news for parents and residents who worry that cars were going too fast near some of the city’s elementary schools.

The city has already painted stripes on Crestmoor Drive, home to Crestmoor Elementary, and added some red curbs there to dissuade drivers from speeding down the street. Similar measures have also been taken around John Muir Elementary School on Cambridge Lane. City staff are working on adding additional measures — which include speed humps and painted stripes to visually break up the street — to the Belle Air and Lomita Park neighborhoods.

City Manager Connie Jackson said the plan, which will come before the City Council at an undecided date in September, is part of a citywide effort to address a desire for traffic-slowing devices but also ensure the city isn’t placing them willy-nilly around town.

“We installed them on Cypress [Avenue] and everyone lined up to have them,” Jackson said. “Those traffic-calming measures worked there, but they divert traffic to other areas. We have to look at this issue more as a whole.”

Residents in Belle Air, including Rosa Fuentes and Tim Buckley, who both shared their concerns with the city’s Traffic, Safety and Parking Committee at a meeting last month, have been among the charge rallying for stop lights, speed humps and anything that would detract drivers from speeding down their streets. Belle Air Elementary in particular sees a traffic jam daily, as parents and students clog up an already narrow street.

Part of the problem is that schools, unlike new businesses and housing developments, are not subject to the same city standards for traffic mitigation, Jackson said.

“There’s a lot going on there, surely,” Jackson said. “It’s an issue that does need to be addressed.”

tramroop@examiner.com

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