San Bruno libraries saved at 11th hour

San Bruno students will continue to have access to school libraries for the 2010-11 school year, according to a new plan approved last week by the San Bruno Park Elementary School District board of trustees.

After the school district made cuts to its $18.9 million budget earlier this year, the elementary school library operation was in jeopardy.

Even in tough economic times, education-code stipulations do not allow volunteers to take over library positions previously held by support staff, Superintendent David Hutt said.

“Before, we were in a position to lay off all positions,” board President Kevin Martinez said. “We now are at a level of support that we can maintain throughout the year. It’s a good place for us to be.”

The plan allows libraries at the eight elementary schools in the district to open with the same staffing levels as the 2009-10 school year on the first day of school today.

“We are ecstatic that we get to have the libraries open at the start of the school year,” Hutt said. “All employees in library positions have reaffirmed they will be going back to their schools this year.”

Library funding comes as a result of the district gaining authority from the State Allocation Board to use proceeds from the sale of surplus property at the former Carl Sandburg Elementary School site, Martinez said.

The actual dollars from the sale cannot be used toward the district’s ongoing expenses, but the funds will be used indirectly to pay for library employee salaries.

“In the plan we submitted to the state, there was an element included saying that the district would be fully capitalizing — on a one-time basis — all post-employee benefits,” Hutt said. “As a result, we had money in the general fund we could use for different purposes and the libraries were our top priority.”

Library schedules will ultimately be determined by each school, but hours are based on a formula of 30 minutes for every 20 students enrolled in the schools, Hutt said. The plan allows every class to have a weekly visit to the library for 30 minutes.

“The times set up for students are very equitable,” Martinez said. “The formula supports student access to libraries, as well as maintenance to library materials.”

shaughey@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocalPeninsula

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Advocates with the San Francisco Public Bank Coalition hold a rally outside City Hall before the Board of Supervisors were to vote on a resolution supporting the creation of a public banking charter on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Should San Francisco run its own public bank? The debate returns

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, momentum was building for San Francisco to… Continue reading

Apprenticeship instructor Mike Miller, center, demonstrates how to set up a theodolite, a hyper-sensitive angle measuring device, for apprentices Daniel Rivas, left, Ivan Aguilar, right, and Quetzalcoatl Orta, far right, at the Ironworkers Local Union 377 training center in Benicia on June 10, 2021. (Photo by Anne Wernikoff, CalMatters)
California’s affordable housing crisis: Are labor union requirements in the way?

By Manuela Tobias CalMatters California lawmakers introduced several bills this year that… Continue reading

People fish at a dock at Islais Creek Park on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What Islais Creek tells us about rising sea levels in San Francisco

Islais Creek is an unassuming waterway along San Francisco’s eastern industrial shoreline,… Continue reading

Organizer Jas Florentino, left, explains the figures which represent 350 kidnapped Africans first sold as slaves in the United States in 1619 in sculptor Dana King’s “Monumental Reckoning.” The installation is in the space of the former Francis Scott Key monument in Golden Gate Park. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What a reparations program would look like in The City

‘If there’s any place we can do it, it’s San Francisco’

Officer Joel Babbs, pictured at a protest outside the Hall of Justice in 2017, is representing himself in an unusually public police misconduct matter. <ins>(Courtesy Bay City News)</ins>
The strange and troubling story of Joel Babbs: What it tells us about the SFPD

The bizarre and troubling career of a whistle-blowing San Francisco police officer… Continue reading

Most Read