SamTrans to hear Bayshore residents' complaints

Residents and business owners in the Bayshore community frustrated by gaps in their transportation options will soon have a chance to air their grievances and help determine solutions.

SamTrans, the county’s transit district, will begin reaching out to members of the isolated community in order to develop a community-based transportation plan that meets the needs of Bayshore.

The heavily low-income neighborhood located in the shadows of San Bruno Mountain and Cow Palace has two main transit options: a Caltrain station and the newly opened but maligned Muni T-Third line that ends at Bayshore Boulevard and Sunnydale Avenue.

The community also has the Bayshore-Brisbane Shuttle, run by SamTrans. The shuttle carries about 141 people a week, said Corinne Goodrich, manager of special projects for SamTrans. Seventy-one percent of the riders, Goodrich added, are retired.

“The people who live here are wanting to go into San Francisco,” Goodrich said. “They’re not wanting to go into Brisbane or Daly City.”

Vanessa Villacarlos owns the historic 7 Mile House restaurant on Bayshore Boulevard. Many of her employees would ride the bus more often if their Fast Passes — a ticket that allows a person to ride BART or Muni anywhere in San Francisco — also allowed them to ride a SamTrans bus to work, she said.

She also recommended a shelter at the bus stop next to her restaurant, noting that during inclement weather, riders huddle underneath the restaurant’s canopy.

With roughly 4,000 people in the neighborhood and 851 households at or below the poverty line, which for a single family is $17,500, only about
7 percent of Bayshore’s residents use public transit, Goodrich said.

“The assumption is if you’re going into low-income communities, therewill likely be transportation issues and gaps because people are low-income,” Goodrich said.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission identified Bayshore, as well as East Palo Alto, as underserved communities, said Joseph Curran, assistant to the Daly City manager. Developing the community-based plan should be a yearlong process of engaging the community to come up with ideas that might better serve the area, Curran said.

Goodrich said the next step would be to convene a stakeholders’ meeting in the community to begin gathering comments on improvement strategies.

dsmith@examiner.com

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