COURTESY RENDERINGVoters rejected the 8 Washington project at the polls on Tuesday.

COURTESY RENDERINGVoters rejected the 8 Washington project at the polls on Tuesday.

S.F. voter turnout light, except in areas near 8 Washington proposal

Few San Francisco voters participated in democracy during Tuesday’s election, and many of those who did came to the polls only to vote on one issue.

About 28,000 ballots were still being counted Wednesday by Department of Elections staffers, making the projected turnout Tuesday about 27 percent.

That’s higher than San Francisco’s lowest-ever turnout, but lower than the 35 percent elections officials hoped for.

And if not for Propositions B and C, in which voters overwhelmingly dismissed plans for condominiums at 8 Washington St. along The Embarcadero, turnout would likely have been even lower.

Prop. B was rejected by 62.1 percent of voters and Prop. C by 66.5 percent.

Turnout barely broke 20 percent through most of the Mission, Marina, Haight-Ashbury and South of Market neighborhoods, according to data compiled by Corey Cook, a politics professor at the University of San Francisco.

And in the Tenderloin, Bayview, Ingleside and Central Market neighborhoods, turnout was closer to 10 percent.

The areas of The City that are traditionally most active in elections – District 8, which includes the Castro and Noe Valley, and District 7, which includes West Portal and neighborhoods west of Twin Peaks – posted turnout closer to 33 percent.

On Telegraph Hill and in the precincts along the northern waterfront, areas closest to where 8 Washington is proposed, 50 percent of voters cast ballots.

Some of these areas contain residential high-rises whose views would have been potentially obstructed by the 134-foot-tall condo complex. Currently, a private athletic club and parking lot occupy the land.8 WashingtonBay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsSan Francisco election

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