S.F. trailing on affordable homes

Although San Francisco has one of the strongest laws requiring developers to offer below-market rate housing opportunities with every new residential building project, The City has trailed behind others in the state in actually creating the new, affordable homes, according to a study released Tuesday.

City housing officials say that’s old news and that hundreds of new units for low- and middle-income families are in the works.

The report, “Affordable by Choice: Trends in California Inclusionary Housing Program,” was created by the San Francisco-based Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California.

As of now, 170 jurisdictions — one-third of all cities and counties in thestate — have some type of inclusionary housing program.

San Francisco’s inclusionary housing ordinance is one of the strongest in the state, said Paul Peninger, co-policy director with the Non-Profit Housing Association. The law applies to all residential developments of five units or more and requires a 15 percent affordable set-aside if the units are built on-site and a 20 percent set aside if the units are built off-site or if in-lieu fees are paid.

The number of inclusionary housing units created in The City in recent years, however, trailed behind other municipalities in the state. From 1999 to 2006, San Francisco averaged about 91 inclusionary units per year, for a total of 634 — while the city of Sacramento averaged about 251 units per year and the city of San Diego averaged 183 units annually.

Doug Shoemaker, from the Mayor’s Office of Housing, said San Francisco’s inclusionary housing program is on the upswing, with 155 units permitted in 2006, and the number of units expected to be approved this year estimated at 309. The City also invests in affordable housing developments that are not part of the inclusionary program, he said.

Cities such as San Diego and Sacramento likely built more inclusionary housing because they were approving more housing overall, Peninger said. Those areas have more land to be developed, he said — but they’re also areas known to be more accommodating to development.

“It’s not always easy for developers of any kind of housing to get their projects approved [in San Francisco],” Peninger said.

beslinger@examiner.com


What can San Francisco do to provide housing?

Share your comments below.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Demonstrators commemorated the life of George Floyd and others killed by police outside S.F. City Hall on June 1, 2020.<ins></ins>
Chauvin verdict: SF reacts after jury finds ex-officer guilty on all charges

San Franciscans were relieved Tuesday after jurors found a former Minneapolis police… Continue reading

San Francisco Unified School District Board member Faauuga Moliga, right, pictured with Superintendent Vincent Matthews on the first day back to classrooms, will be board vice president for the remander of the 2121 term. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Faauuga Moliga named as school board vice president to replace Alison Collins

The San Francisco school board on Tuesday selected board member Fauuga Moliga… Continue reading

Legislation by Supervisor Rafael Mandelman would require The City to add enough new safe camping sites, such as this one at 180 Jones St. in the Tenderloin, to accomodate everyone living on the street. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
City would create sites for hundreds of tents under new homeless shelter proposal

Advocates say funding better spent on permanent housing

An instructor at Sava Pool teaches children drowning prevention techniques. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Indoor city pools reopen for lap swimming and safety classes

Two of San Francisco’s indoor city pools reopened Tuesday, marking another step… Continue reading

A construction worker rides on top of materials being transported out of the Twin Peaks Tunnel as work continues at West Portal Station on Thursday, August 16, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA’s poor track record on capital projects risks losing ‘public trust’

Supervisors say cost overruns and delays could jeapordize future ballot revenue measures

Most Read