S.F. supes extend helping hand to immigrants

As immigrants face skyrocketing application fees from the federal government, a new proposal by Supervisor Chris Daly could give financial assistance to those applying for citizenship.

Under a new fee structure the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services implemented last week, an immigrant applying for a green card would pay $930, an increase of $605. Other fees that increased were citizenship applications, which went from $330 to $595.

Daly requested on Tuesday that the city attorney draft legislation to create a plan to provide city subsidies to immigrants applying for citizenship, green cards and petitions for relatives, and workers. He has also requested an analysis of the total cost immigrants in San Francisco pay for such services.

Daly said the fee increases raise concerns that immigrants “cannot obtain safe pathways to legal immigrant status and citizenship” and “further exacerbatespressures on families, increasing stress.”

In further support given to immigrants, Supervisor Gerardo Sandoval introduced a resolution Tuesday condemning the “defamatory language used by radio personality Michael Savage against immigrants.” Sandoval’s resolution comes after Savage’s July 5 broadcast, during which he made a number of comments involving a group of students who were fasting to advocate for immigration policy changes. Savage said, “I would say, let them fast until they starve to death, then that solves the problem.” The resolution calls the comments “symbolic of hatred and racism.”

“I really for the life of me cannot understand why there is not more media outrage to what Michael Savage said,” Sandoval said. He plans on holding a press conference on the steps of City Hall this Tuesday prior to the Board of Supervisors vote on the resolution. “The intolerant and racist comments of Michael Savage demand a strong condemnation,” Sandoval said.

jsabatini@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A health care worker receives the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. (Go Nakamura/Getty Images/TNS)
City sets ambitious goal to vaccinate residents by June

Limited supply slows distribution of doses as health officials seek to expand access

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden and Jill Biden arrive at Biden's inauguration on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2021, in Washington, DC.  (Win McNamee/Getty Images/TNS)
Joe Biden issues call for ‘unity’ amidst extreme partisan rancor

‘I will be a president for all Americans,’ he says in inauguration speech

MARIETTA, GA - NOVEMBER 15: Democratic U.S. Senate candidates Jon Ossoff (R) and Raphael Warnock (L) of Georgia taps elbows during a rally for supporters on November 15, 2020 in Marietta, Georgia. Both become senators Wednesday.  (Jenny Jarvie/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Vice President Harris swears in senators Padilla, Warnock, Ossoff

New Democratic senators tip balance of power in upper legislative house

President Joe Biden plans to sign a number of executive orders over the next week. (Biden Transition/CNP/Zuma Press/TNS)
Biden signals new direction by signing mask order on his first day in office

President plans ambitious 10-day push of executive orders, legislation

Kamala Harris is sworn in as vice president by U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor as her husband Doug Emhoff looks on at the inauguration of U.S. President Joe Biden on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 20, 2021, in Washington, D.C. (Alex Wong/Getty Images/TNS)
A new turn in history: Kamala Harris sworn in as 49th vice president

Noah Bierman and Melanie Mason Los Angeles Times Kamala Devi Harris, born… Continue reading

Most Read