S.F. sees calm amid All-Star storm

Despite the crowds and the spectacle of Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game and its festivities, The City experienced relative calm leading into Tuesday — too calm for some near AT&T Park.

San Francisco police made three arrests Saturday: two for public drunkenness and one for child endangerment when a parent who was drinking left their child alone on the swings outside, according to the police. The Police Department, having formed a task force with federal law enforcement agencies and Major League Baseball, made 32 arrests before Tuesday on trademark infringements after they had publicly put counterfeiters of apparel and other materials on notice for the weekend.

“Up to the game, it’s been a very peaceful event. It seems people have really enjoyed themselves,” San Francisco police Sgt. Steve Mannina said.

Estimates heading into the All-Star break were that The City would reap $60 million in extra revenue with expectations of 100,000 visitors. There were no estimates yet for the extra revenue generated by the visitors to the Bay Area and The City specifically, but the crowds around Union Square and the Moscone Convention Center — site of FanFest — have not gone unnoticed, said Carol Piasente, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce spokeswoman.

At Tres Agaves, a restaurant on Townsend Street just a block from the ballpark, Monday night’s crowd after the Home Run Derby was “great for a Monday,” said Eric Rubin, the restaurant’s managingpartner.

“It wasn’t any better than a good Friday night,” Rubin said. “Our Friday and Saturday nights were terrible.”

Rubin said crowds stayed away from the area “in droves” because the media had portrayed all the action as happening near Union Square.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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