S.F. enters new planning era with $15.7B, 10-year blueprint

While most major cities have a multiyear capital plan that outlines overall spending priorities, San Francisco has gone without one for more than 15 years — until now.

Two years ago, Mayor Gavin Newsom pledged to create a capital plan; last year, Supervisor Sean Elsbernd moved the plan forward by drafting legislation requiring The City to annually develop a 10-year plan for city-owned facilities and infrastructure that would be constrained by identified and proposed revenue sources.

On Monday, the proposed $15.7 billion blueprint for the future, a book of more than 100 pages, was submitted to Newsom and the Board of Supervisors.

Within the document, funding is addressed for a wide variety of critical capital needs for The City’s water and sewer systems, port and airport, mass transit and roadway network, parks and plazas, and public health and public protection facilities. In addition, the plan outlined four spending priorities including $1.6 billion for earthquake safety improvements at critical city facilities such as San Francisco General; $30 million to fund disability access improvements for city facilities; $450 million for The City’s parks system and $87 million for general maintenance of city facilities, roads and infrastructure.

The report notes that the $87 million is not enough to undo the damage done by years of maintenance neglect, estimated at more than $1.3 billion.

“The $87 million is what we should spend to maintain what we currently have in place,” said Gary Hoy of the City’s Capital Planning Program. “Our intention is to move forward, but still hopefully find other ways to solve the backlog [deferred maintenance] problem.”

Elsbernd said he was “excited” to have a citywide spending plan that will help The City address critical infrastructure needs instead of putting them off for the future.

“I look forward to seeing this plan implemented; this will not be a plan that gets put up on a shelf,” Elsbernd said, adding that the capital plan will be updated every year.

A public hearing on the capital plan is scheduled for the Board of Supervisors Budget & Finance Committee on May 17.

beslinger@examiner.com

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