Runners to celebrate 100 years of Bay To Breakers race in ceremonial run

Organizers of the annual Bay to Breakers race in San Francisco will be celebrating the event’s 100th anniversary on New Year’s Day with a special ceremonial run, organizers announced Thursday.

The event was first held in 1912 and was called the Cross City Race.

Now, runners from some of the original groups, including the Olympic Club, Saint Mary’s College, the YMCA and the Dolphin South End Running Club, will be participating in a ceremonial run to commemorate the anniversary.

The ceremonial run will begin at 10 a.m. at the intersection of The Embarcadero and Market Street.

The run will also mark the opening of general registration for the Bay to Breakers 12K run, scheduled for May 15.

This year, race officials, police and private security personnel will strictly enforce rules banning alcohol, floats and any objects with wheels, including baby strollers, bicycles, shopping carts, skateboards and roller blades, race officials said. Pets are also prohibited.

Participation in this year’s race will be limited to 50,000 people.

AEG, organizer of Bay to Breakers, shares the same owners as Clarity Media, which oversees The Examiner.

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