Rose Pak speaks about Ed Lee and the SF mayoral election

Rose Pak was found dead on Sunday. (Examiner file)

Rose Pak, perhaps the most infamous supporter of mayoral candidate Ed Lee (depending on how you feel about Wille Brown), conveyed what empowered the Chinese community in San Francisco to vote in Tuesday's election and what a loss by Lee could mean.

Early election numbers have voter turnout as sluggish, although talk of a high number of voters in Chinatown has run through the rumor mill. Pak told The San Francisco Examiner that this could be for several reasons – primarily, that there are a number of Chinese American candidates running for mayor this election cycle.

“It has generated a lot of interest in the community,” Pak says.

Second, Pak says, there was a big voter registration push this year.

Third, the Chinese media has been reporting extensively on the race, keeping Chinese residents well informed and the election a constant topic of conversation.

So with the Chinese community proving to hold a major political stake in this race, who will they vote for?

“I believe that 80 percent of our community will be casting for [Ed Lee],” Pak says. 

Despite her confidence, Pak is afraid of one thing.

“I am very fearful that if [Lee] loses, our voters will go back to apathy and will not want to try again,” she says. “He has to win this election to make sure that all our people understand how important their one vote is.”

juliachan@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsEd LeeGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsRose PakUnder the Dome

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