Road repairs now mean savings in the future

Redwood City began resurfacing projects on a number of neighborhood streets Wednesday as part of its roadway preventative maintenance program.

While motorists may face minor inconveniences associated with road construction, Project Engineer Kevin Fehr said the timing is necessary.

“We will save money in the long run by doing regular maintenance,” Fehr said. “If we let these things go too long, the price can skyrocket because we would have to replace the entire roadway rather than just the surface.”

In addition to saving the city money in the future, resurfacing will provide smoother and safer roadways for motorists. The project, which is expected to take around eight to 10 weeks, will involve minor treatments such as filling potholes and major repairs of roads in need, Fehr said.

Every few years, the state reviews city road conditions and provides an overall score. Redwood City’s most recent score was around 73. City officials have been using Street Saver, an online database coordinated by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, to prioritize construction in the most cost-effective manner, Fehr said.

On Wednesday, construction crews began what will be five-day-a-week shifts from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on various streets between Woodside and Edgewood roads. While the project only involves daytime work, commuters will face intermittent lane closures, detours and temporary parking restrictions.

shaughey@sfexaminer.com

 

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