Rev. Canon Sally Bingham on the religious case for environmentalism

The author of “Love God Heal Earth: 21 Leading Religious Voices Speak Out on Our Sacred Duty to Protect the Environment” is a homemaker-turned- priest trying to reverse global warming from the pulpit. She is an environmental minister at Grace Cathedral, site of the annual Energy Oscars on Tuesday.

How did you get the idea to rally people of all faiths to fight climate change? The changes we need to make to combat climate change are cultural. No moral issue with a cultural change as the solution has ever happened in America without the voice of religion. Consider slavery, civil rights, women’s rights, women’s and children’s education.

Can religious leaders be more effective in bringing change? Religious leaders preaching about environmental stewardship from the pulpit are going to be more influential [than lawmakers]. So many people go to church and people trust the clergy. You have major institutions with 20,000 congregants coming to church every day. It’s hugely powerful.

What inspired you to become a priest? There was a disconnect between what Christians said they believed in and how they behaved. 

What kind of disconnect? I never heard a clergy person preach about stewardship of creation, yet we are called to be the caretakers. God put Adam in the garden to till and to keep it [Genesis, Chapter 2].
 

Bay Area Newsclimate changeenvironmentLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Diners at Teeth, a bar in the Mission District, on July 9, 2021. Teeth began using digital menus based on QR code technology in August. (Ulysses Ortega/The New York Times)
The football stadium at UC Berkeley, on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. George Kliavkoff, a former top executive at MGM Resorts International, took over the conference at the start of the month. (Jim Wilson/The New York Times)
What’s Ahead for the Pac-12? New commissioner weighs in

‘Every decision we make is up for discussion. There are no sacred cows.’

The sidewalk on Egbert Avenue in the Bayview recently was cluttered with car parts, tires and other junk. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
New surveillance effort aims to crack down on illegal dumping

’We want to make sure we catch people who are trashing our streets’

As the world reeled, tech titans supplied the tools that made life and work possible. Now the companies are awash in money and questions about what it means to win amid so much loss. (Nicolas Ortega/The New York Times)
How tech won the pandemic and now may never lose

By David Streitfeld New York Times In April 2020, with 2,000 Americans… Continue reading

Most Read