Retrial begins in fatal Vacaville school crash

Testimony begins today at the second trial of a Fairfield man charged with second-degree murder, vehicular manslaughter and assault with a deadly weapon after his car crashed into a group of people in front of a Vacaville elementary school in 2005.

A jury was selected Tuesday at David Michael Bell's trial in Solano County Superior Court. Bell's first trial ended with a hung jury in February.

Bell, 26, is charged with the second-degree murder and vehicular manslaughter of Paden Elementary School students Ana Cardenas, 9 and her brother Luis, 7, on Oct. 19, 2005. Ten other people were injured.

Defense attorney Daniel Russo argued during the first trial his client lost control of his Ford Taurus when he suffered a seizure, a condition that had not been diagnosed before the accident. Russo said Bell also suffers from other disabilities.

Prosecutor John Kealy claimed Bell drove fast past the school because he was angry and frustrated about traffic in the area.

Vacaville police said at the time of the accident that Bell's Ford Taurus drove at a high rate of speed on the right shoulder of Davis Street to pass slow traffic.

The Taurus struck a parked Chevrolet Camaro, pushing it 100 feet north on Davis Street, then continued on the sidewalk near the school. Bell's car and the Camaro struck the victims on the sidewalk and the Taurus stopped after it collided with a tree in a front yard, police said.

The trial is being held before Solano County Superior Court Judge Ramona Garrett in Fairfield.

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