Residents decry site’s pollution

Residents and boat owners at Oyster Point and Oyster Cove Marinas continue to push claims that a nearby construction site is violating environmental and city regulations despite recent reports finding it in compliance with the law.

Most recently, on Sunday, John Moses, a boat owner who has berthed his boat at Oyster Cove for eight years, said he observed excavation activity on the 8.8-acre site on Sunday, something the contractor, Hathaway Dinwiddie is not permitted to do, according to the city.

The city investigated the accusation and found that workers were only conducting maintenance on the slag-screening machine, City Engineer Ray Razavi said, something they’re permitted to do on the weekends.

“We’re ready to shut them down if there was any grading operation going on,” Razavi said.

Boat users and those living on their boats, known as “live-aboards,” also complained during the fall about dust they say was swept up from the excavation site by wind coming down off San Bruno Mountain and dropped all over their boats.

The site, formerly a U.S. Steel plant, has large amounts of slag, a byproduct of steel production, that needs excavation before construction can begin on Slough Estates’ 315,444-square-foot research and development facility with underground parking.

The concerned citizens had the samples tested, and they say the dust contains 17 different heavy metals, including cadmium, chromium and lead. At the City Council meeting on Nov. 29, however, officials from the Bay Area AirQuality Management District and San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board said that their data showed the site was in full compliance with environmental and regulatory policies, noting that the dust could be coming from U.S. Highway 101.

The complaints have pitted the marina users against the contractor and developer of 333 Oyster Point Blvd. The city is caught in the middle, South San Francisco Vice Mayor Richard Garbarino said.

“You’ve got two agencies saying this is what their findings are,” Garbarino said. “I think the argument is between boat owners and state agencies.”

Moses said that outsiders he has described the problem to encourage him to contact a lawyer, but there were no plans to do so.

“No one seems willing or able to enforce the violations,” Moses said. “They just have excuses for everything that occurs over there.”

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

An empty space where a Shared Spaces parklet once stood outside Aquitaine Wine Bistro on Church Street on Wednesday, June 23, 2021. The parklet was recently destroyed in a car crash. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Cars and parklets don’t mix: SF searches for solutions in wake of accidents

Andrew Fidelman got the call in the middle of the night from… Continue reading

Supervisor Dean Preston speaks about rent relief at a meeting of Faith in Action, a nonprofit serving low-income residents. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
How to apply for post-pandemic rent relief in San Francisco and California

Reyna Aguilar has amassed $20,000 in rent debt since losing her restaurant… Continue reading

Transit-only lanes on Mission Street have reduced travel times by 20 percent during the pandemic, transit officials say. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Pandemic experiments morph into long-term solutions for SF transit agency

The streets of San Francisco became real-time laboratories for The City’s public… Continue reading

NO CONNECTION TO SERVER:
Unable to connect to GPS server ‘blackpress.newsengin.com’
Debate reignites over San Francisco’s first public bank

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, momentum was building for San Francisco to… Continue reading

Owners of Levi’s Plaza on The Embarcadero say gas boilers on the property will be replaced by electric and solar sources in the next few years. (Shutterstock)
Big plans for clean power at Levi’s Plaza

Transition to net zero carbon in step with S.F.’s environmental goals

Most Read