Residents catch break on parking issues

Burlingame Residents living adjacent to commercial areas have found themselves with either a shortage of on-street parking or getting ticketed for restrictions meant to discourage all-day parking by commuters or employees of nearby businesses.

After years of studying the impacts of residential parking restrictions, City Council members voted to make permanent a pilot program that allows residents to buy annual permits so they can park on their streets for as long as they desire — two for $50.

To combat parking that spilled over from the downtown shopping district, Burlingame city officials several years ago approved time limits on residential streets surrounding the main road.

In June 2008, the city launched its residential parking permit pilot program — on Occidental and Bellevue avenues — in response to complaints from neighbors. The program will expand to other residential streets with two- or four-hour parking restrictions by the end of the year, according to Burlingame police traffic Sgt. Don Shepley.

“By putting restrictions on the number of hours to park, it penalizes the people that live in those areas,” he said. “We want to be able to help residents park in front of their own home without being cited.”

Residents cannot individually apply for the permits, however. An application can only be filed on behalf of a neighborhood. If 67 percent of the neighbors support a permit, the city will consider the application.

Shepley said if a permit is granted, it’s transferable between household vehicles.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsBurlingameLocalParkingTransittransportation

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