Residents cash in on greening

Even if the momentum for green financing has slowed during the recession, residents should not shrug off the idea of energy savings just yet.

This week, The City is launching a new tax credit that will give residents a good reason to retrofit their houses so they are more energy ­efficient.

Residents can score up to $2,000, depending on their income, once they receive an energy audit and implement changes to their homes that, at the very least, can cut energy use by 20 percent, said Raymond Manion, energy specialist for the Department of the Environment.

The new funds, which amount to roughly $650,000, are being funneled through the federal stimulus program, allowing as many as 430 homes in San Francisco to make energy improvements, officials said.

Homeowners only can get the money back once they have an energy audit and complete the improvements, Manion said.

The City is piggybacking on PG&E’s rebate program, which offers up to $3,500 to residents who make energy-saving improvements to their homes.

The two tax credits combined could save the average homeowner as much as $8,000, said Matt Golden, president of Recurve, a San Francisco-based green-retrofitting firm.

“It’s meant to drive rapid adoption in The City,” Golden said. “This is the first program to really promote energy efficiency in residential buildings.”

The new program comes on the heels of The City being forced to suspend its $150 million green-financing program, which would have helped thousands of property owners lower their utility bills.

The program, called Property Assessment Clean Energy, is funded through a citywide Mello-Roos special tax district. The loans have no cap and are attached to the property, not the individual owner. They are repaid through property taxes during the life of the loan.

esherbert@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPG&EPoliticsrebate

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott listens at a rally to commemorate the life of George Floyd and others killed by police outside City Hall on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Will the Biden Administration help SF speed up police reform?

City has struggled to implement changes without federal oversight

Lowell High School (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Students, families call for culture shift at Lowell after racist incident

District to explore changes including possible revision of admissions policy

Alan Wong was among California National Guard members deployed to Sacramento to provide security the weekend before the presidential inauguration. (Courtesy photo)
CCSF board member tests positive for COVID-19 after National Guard deployment

Alan Wong spent eight days in Sacramento protecting State Capitol before Inauguration Day

Due to a lack of votes in his favor, record-holding former Giant Barry Bonds (pictured at tribute to Willie McCovey in 2018) will not be entering the National Baseball Hall of Fame in the near future.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Ex-Giants star Barry Bonds again falls short of Hall of Fame

After striking out yet again in his bid to join Major League… Continue reading

San Francisco firefighter Keith Baraka has filed suit against The City alleging discrimination on the basis of race and sexual orientation.<ins></ins>
Gay black firefighter sues city for discrimination

A San Francisco firefighter who says he was harassed and discriminated against… Continue reading

Most Read